Rebuking Trump, Warmbier family says North Korea’s Kim to blame for son’s death
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Rebuking Trump, Warmbier family says North Korea’s Kim to blame for son’s death

Parents of Jewish American college student insist they hold ‘evil regime’ in Pyongyang responsible for his death, after US president says he takes autocrat ‘at his word’

Fred Warmbier, right, and Cindy Warmbier, parents of Otto Warmbier, a Jewish American who died days after his release from captivity in North Korea, wait for a meeting on May 3, 2018, at the United Nations headquarters. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)
Fred Warmbier, right, and Cindy Warmbier, parents of Otto Warmbier, a Jewish American who died days after his release from captivity in North Korea, wait for a meeting on May 3, 2018, at the United Nations headquarters. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

The family of a Jewish American college student who died after being imprisoned by North Korea said Friday it holds the country’s leader Kim Jong Un and his “evil regime” responsible for his death.

The statement from Otto Warmbier’s parents came a day after US President Donald Trump said after meeting with Kim that he took the North Korean leader “at his word” that he was unaware of the alleged mistreatment of Warmbier.

“We have been respectful during this summit process. Now we must speak out. Kim and his evil regime are responsible for the death of our son Otto,” Fred and Cindy Warmbier said.

“Kim and his evil regime are responsible for unimaginable cruelty and inhumanity. No excuse or lavish praise can change that,” they added without naming Trump.

Otto Warmbier died in June 2017 after being returned home in a vegetative state. His parents say he was tortured.

Otto Warmbier arriving at a court for his trial in Pyongyang, North Korea, March 16, 2015. (Xinhua/Lu Rui via Getty Images/JTA)

Trump responded later Friday to the Warmbiers, claiming on Twitter that his remarks were misinterpreted and that he “of course” holds North Korea fully responsible, though he made no mention of Kim.

“Remember, I got Otto out along with three others. The previous Administration did nothing, and he was taken on their watch,” Trump said.

“Otto Warmbier will not have died in vain… I love Otto and think of him often,” he added.

Trump had used Warmbier’s death as a rallying cry against the North Korea’s human rights abuses before softening his rhetoric ahead of talks with Kim.

At the time of his return, Trump had said that Warmbier “was tortured beyond belief,” using him as an example of brutality in North Korea.

On Thursday Trump said: “I don’t believe that he would have allowed that to happen, it just wasn’t to his advantage to happen. Those prisons are rough, they’re rough places, and bad things happened. But I really don’t believe that he, I don’t believe that he knew about it.”

The president’s comments about the Warmbier case called to mind other times when he chose to believe autocrats over his own intelligence agencies, including siding with the Saudi royal family regarding the death of journalist Jamal Khashoggi and supporting Russia’s Vladimir Putin’s denials that he interfered with the 2016 election.

US President Donald Trump (R) walks with North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un during a break in talks at the second US-North Korea summit at the Sofitel Legend Metropole hotel in Hanoi, Vietnam, on February 28, 2019. (Saul Loeb/AFP)

He drew a rebuke from House Speaker Nancy Pelosi. “There is something wrong with Putin, Kim Jong Un — in my view, thugs — that the president chooses to believe,” said Pelosi, a California Democrat.

Some prominent Republicans spoke out to condemn North Korea and express support for the Warmbier family.

“We must remember Otto, and we should never let North Korea off the hook for what they did to him,” Ohio’s Republican senator, Rob Portman, said in a statement.

Portman has been in contact with Warmbier’s family since the suburban Cincinnati youth was imprisoned in early 2016 for allegedly stealing a propaganda poster.

Trump’s former UN ambassador Nikki Haley said on Twitter that “Americans know the cruelty that was placed on Otto Warmbier by the North Korean regime. Our hearts are with the Warmbier family for their strength and courage. We will never forget Otto.”

Warmbier, a University of Virginia student, had been visiting North Korea with a tour group when he was detained. A court there sentenced him to 15 years of hard labor for the alleged offense.

Upon his release, North Korea said Warmbier’s health had deteriorated after a bout of botulism. Warmbier’s doctors in the US said he suffered extensive brain damage.

Fred and Cindy Warmbier are recognized during the State of the Union address at the US Capitol in Washington, DC, on January 30, 2018. (AFP/Nicholas Kamm)

Last year, a US judge ordered North Korea to pay more than $500 million in a wrongful death suit filed by Warmbier’s parents.

US District Judge Beryl Howell in Washington harshly condemned North Korea for “barbaric mistreatment” of Warmbier, awarding punitive damages and payments covering medical expenses, economic loss and pain and suffering to parents Fred and Cindy Warmbier.

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