Roy Moore’s wife fights anti-Semitic tag: ‘One of our attorneys is a Jew’
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'We have very close friends who are Jewish and rabbis'

Roy Moore’s wife fights anti-Semitic tag: ‘One of our attorneys is a Jew’

The controversial Republican Senate candidate's wife says 'fake news will tell you we don't care for Jews'

Kayla Moore, the wife of US Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a campaign rally, Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Midland City, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)
Kayla Moore, the wife of US Senate candidate Roy Moore speaks at a campaign rally, Monday, Dec. 11, 2017, in Midland City, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

A day ahead of a key election, the wife of Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore defended her husband Monday against accusations of bigotry by pointing out that one of their attorneys “is a Jew.”

“Fake news will tell you we don’t care for Jews,” Kayla Moore said at a rally for her husband in rural Alabama.  “Well, one of our attorneys is a Jew. We have very close friends who are Jewish and rabbis,” she said.

Kayla Moore said she wanted to clear the record for the large media presence at her husband’s final rally before Tuesday’s vote.

Facing voters at last after the year’s most bitter US campaign,  Moore cast himself Monday as the victim of a national barrage of unjust allegations of sexual misconduct with teenagers.

On election eve, Moore called in to a conservative talk radio show in Alabama to lament the tone of the campaign and portray cast himself as the victim of the sexual misconduct allegations.

In a Tuesday, Dec. 5, 2017 file photo, Steve Bannon, left, introduces US senatorial candidate Roy Moore, right, during a campaign rally, in Fairhope, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

“We’ve seen things happen in this campaign that I can’t believe to this day,” said Moore, who has denied all wrongdoing in contacts with the women who said he behaved inappropriately when they were in their teens and he was a local prosecutor in his 30s. One said he initiated sexual contact when she was 14.

“It’s just been hard, a hard campaign,” said Moore, a former Alabama Supreme Court chief justice who was twice removed from that post for violating judicial ethics.

At an evening rally in the state’s rural southeast, Moore told voters, “If you don’t believe in my character, don’t vote for me.”

Former White House strategist Steve Bannon, who also spoke the Moore rally, argued that the election is “greater than Judge Moore and even greater than the people of Alabama,” casting it as a referendum on Trump’s agenda.

Alabama has been a solidly Republican state for years, and Moore said he is much more in tune with the issues that matter to voters — and to the president.

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