CCTV said to confirm Berlin truck attacker transited France
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CCTV said to confirm Berlin truck attacker transited France

Surveillance footage shows Anis Amri in French city of Lyon days before he killed 12 people at Christmas market

The body of suspected Berlin attacker Ani Amri is covered with a blanket after a shootout near a train station in Milan's Sesto San Giovanni neighborhood, Italy, early Friday, December 23, 2016. (AP Photo/Daniele Bennati)
The body of suspected Berlin attacker Ani Amri is covered with a blanket after a shootout near a train station in Milan's Sesto San Giovanni neighborhood, Italy, early Friday, December 23, 2016. (AP Photo/Daniele Bennati)

Surveillance footage confirms that Anis Amri, the suspected Berlin truck attacker gunned down by Italian police, transited through the French city of Lyon by train, a source close to the investigation said Monday.

“A man corresponding to the killer was spotted on the afternoon of Thursday, December 22, on a platform at the (Lyon-Part-Dieu) station wearing a cap and backpack,” the source said, confirming media reports. “He appears alone in these images.”

The source said investigators are still trying to determine how 24-year-old Amri, suspected of using a hijacked truck to kill 12 people, including an Israeli woman, at a Christmas market in Berlin a week ago, was able to leave the German capital to reach France and then Italy.

Amri was the focus of a four-day Europe-wide manhunt before being shot dead by police in Milan after firing at officers.

This undated picture provided by Najoua Amri on Thursday, Dec. 22, 2016, shows Anis Amri, the fugitive Tunisian extremist suspected in Berlin's deadly Christmas market attack, posing at his parents' house in Oueslatia, central Tunisia. (Courtesy Najoua Amri to AP)
This undated picture provided by Najoua Amri on Thursday, Dec. 22, 2016, shows Anis Amri, the fugitive Tunisian extremist suspected in Berlin’s deadly Christmas market attack, posing at his parents’ house in Oueslatia, central Tunisia. (Courtesy Najoua Amri to AP)

About 200 people protested in the Tunisian capital on Saturday against the return of Tunisian jihadis who have fought abroad.

The gathering was prompted by Amri, who had pledged allegiance to the Islamic State group and was slated to be deported home from Germany.

Banners at the protest Saturday in front of Parliament in Tunis read “Close the doors to terrorism” and “No tolerance, no return.” Protesters waved Tunisian flags and sang the national anthem.

Protester Faten Mejri said “for us, they are not Tunisians. They are awful people.”

Tunisia says at least 800 Tunisian jihadis are under surveillance since returning home after fighting in Syria, Iraq and Libya.

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