Three-quarters of Israeli Jews and nearly two-thirds of Israeli Arabs would not marry someone from a different religion, according to a poll.

Conducted by Haaretz and the Dialog company on Tuesday and Wednesday, the poll found that opposition to interfaith relationships was highest among ultra-Orthodox Jews, at 95 percent. But 88% of traditional and religious Jews, as well as 64 percent of secular Jews, also opposed such relationships.

Seventy-one percent of Muslim Israeli Arabs opposed interfaith relationships; half of Christian Israeli Arabs were opposed.

Across religious denominations, Israeli Jews would be much more opposed to their relatives marrying Arabs than they would be to relatives marrying non-Arab non-Jews. Only a third of secular Jewish Israelis would be opposed to a relative marrying an American or European Christian, but a majority would oppose a relative marrying an Arab. Seventy-two percent of Israeli Jews overall would be opposed to a relative marrying an Arab.

Opposition to intermarriage was lowest among immigrants from the former Soviet Union. More than half would avoid having a relationship with a non-Jew, but if they were to fall in love with a non-Jew, only 35% would insist their spouse convert.

Two-thirds of Israeli Jews see intermarriage as a serious threat to Jews worldwide, and one-third see it as a serious threat to Jews in Israel.

The poll questioned 505 respondents and had a 4.4%m margin of error.

Morel Malka (photo credit: screen capture Channel 2)

Morel Malka (photo credit: screen capture Channel 2)

Last week, a small far-right group protested in Jaffa outside the wedding of an Israeli Arab, Mahmoud Mansour, and his Jewish-born Israeli bride, Morel Malka, who had converted to Islam.