WASHINGTON — US President Donald Trump is considering former Connecticut Senator Joe Lieberman to be the next FBI director, the White House announced Wednesday.

Lieberman, an Orthodox Jew, will meet with the president Wednesday afternoon, along with three other candidates, press secretary Sean Spicer told reporters.

The opening to lead the nation’s top law enforcement agency comes after Trump abruptly fired James Comey last week, setting off a firestorm of controversy in the nation’s capital.

Comey was investigating the Trump campaign for possible collusion with Russian operatives to influence the 2016 election, and his termination fueled speculation that Trump was attempting to impeded the bureau’s probe.

The New York Times dropped a bombshell report Tuesday that said Comey kept contemporaneous memos of his meetings with Trump, and that during a private conversation in the Oval Office in February, Trump asked him to drop the FBI’s investigation into former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

“I hope you can let this go,” Trump was reported to have told Comey, according to the memo. The disclosure had lawmakers on Capitol Hill demanding to see the memos and hear directly from Comey.

FBI Director James Comey at the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Russian actions during the 2016 election campaign on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on March 20, 2017. (AFP/Nicholas Kamm)

FBI Director James Comey at the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence hearing on Russian actions during the 2016 election campaign on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, on March 20, 2017. (AFP/Nicholas Kamm)

Chairman of the House Oversight Committee Jason Chaffetz asked Comey Wednesday to appear before his committee next week.

Trump is also looking at acting FBI Director Andrew McCabe, former Oklahoma Gov. Frank Keating (R) and former FBI official Richard McFeely to replace Comey.

Lieberman was the first Jew to ever appear on a presidential ballot when, in 2000, Al Gore elected him as his running mate.

Lieberman later became an independent in the Senate, where he became known for his hawkishness on foreign policy.

He enthusiastically supported Arizona Sen. John McCain’s run for the White House in 2008. He also supported Hillary Clinton over Trump in 2016.

“It’s a clear choice that she’s so much better for the future of the country,” he said on the campaign trail.