Join top economist to learn how Israel can crawl out of COVID financial crisis
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Behind the headlinesTimes of Israel Community exclusive

Join top economist to learn how Israel can crawl out of COVID financial crisis

Access Wednesday’s Behind the Headlines webinar by becoming a ToI Community member today

Former Bank of Israel deputy governor Nadine Baudot-Trajtenberg (Bank of Israel)
Former Bank of Israel deputy governor Nadine Baudot-Trajtenberg (Bank of Israel)

In this week’s installment of The Times of Israel’s new Behind the Headlines online video series, ToI’s Startup Israel editor Shoshanna Solomon speaks with former Bank of Israel deputy governor Nadine Baudot-Trajtenberg to examine what’s unique about Israel’s COVID-19 economic challenge and how to restore trust in the economic system.

The video conversation with Baudot-Trajtenberg will be presented to Times of Israel Community members this Wednesday, August 5, at 1 p.m. Eastern/8 p.m. Israel. If you’ve not yet joined the ToI Community, you can sign up here.

Canada-born Baudot-Trajtenberg has an MA in Philosophy, Politics and Economics from the University of Oxford in England and a PhD in Economics from Harvard University. After leaving her post at the Bank of Israel in 2019, she spent a few months at the Bank of International Settlements, which along with the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund sets out economic policy, and has now joined the faculty of the Tiomkin School of Economics at the IDC Herzliya, a private college.

In a previous interview with The Times of Israel, Baudot-Trajtenberg said that Israel must set out a clear economic program to enable it to climb out of the economic crisis, instead of just dishing out money and announcing rescue plans that have not been fully thought through.

A protester holds a sign depicting Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a protest a against him outside Prime Minister residence in Jerusalem, Friday, July 31, 2020. Protesters demanded that the embattled Israeli leader resign as he faces a trial on corruption charges and grapples with a deepening coronavirus crisis. (AP Photo/Oded Balilty)

What Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s government has done until now, she said, “is just an opening of the purse. We haven’t seen a program.”

The NIS 6 billion handout plan was a “bewildering response,” said Baudot-Trajtenberg, “so thoughtless” in light of the fact that the government had months to figure out what to do, she said. And whereas the “generous” plan to extend unemployment benefits to June 2021 does provide some sort of lifeline for the jobless, she said, it is inherently flawed because it is only a “short-term” fix.

Everybody now is pretty aware that we’re going to be living with this crisis for at least a year

“Everybody now is pretty aware that we’re going to be living with this crisis for at least a year,” she said. “The virus is not going anywhere.” And if that is the case then the policies must be designed much more carefully — “a lot more than what the government has done.”

Hear concrete ideas on how the country can survive — and even thrive — in a post-coronavirus crisis economy during Wednesday’s Behind the Headlines conversation.

In the coming weeks, ToI reporters and editors will be video-interviewing more influential individuals from a wide spectrum of fields and on diverse topics for the series. Like The Times of Israel itself, the Behind the Headlines series aims to offer a fair, deep look at some of today’s burning issues and noteworthy personalities.

If you’d like to join the session with Baudot-Trajtenberg — it’s not too late. Become a Times of Israel Community member today and you’ll gain access to this Wednesday’s session, along with all of our upcoming exclusive webinars. You’ll also gain an ad-free experience of the ToI site and apps, and a weekly insider letter from David Horovitz.

If you are already a ToI Community member, you’ll receive a link to the session by email on Wednesday.

Check out these previous Behind the Headlines conversations, with Bret Stephens of The New York Times and with archeologist Dr. Joe Uziel:

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