Labor Party promises PM a Knesset ‘safety net’ for peace
search

Labor Party promises PM a Knesset ‘safety net’ for peace

John Kerry meets with Abbas in Amman; Meretz party leader: New construction in Jerusalem ‘giving the Americans the finger’

Elie Leshem is deputy editor of The Times of Israel.

US Secretary of State John Kerry with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a meeting in Jerusalem, Thursday, June 27, 2013 (photo credit: AP/Jacquelyn Martin)
US Secretary of State John Kerry with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu during a meeting in Jerusalem, Thursday, June 27, 2013 (photo credit: AP/Jacquelyn Martin)

Despite bitter differences on economic and social policy, the head of Israel’s opposition will back Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in the event that US-led efforts to broker new peace talks with the Palestinians bear fruit.

“The Israeli government must hold a dialogue that’s driven by optimism, rather than become addicted to the traditional mantra that there’s no chance,” Labor Party chief MK Shelly Yachimovich said Friday amid US Secretary of State John Kerry’s fifth trip to the region in three months.

Kerry, who is pursuing an American-led push to revive long-dormant talks between Israel and the Palestinians, on Thursday night held a four-hour dinner meeting with Netanyahu that stretched into Friday morning. He was having lunch with Abbas on Friday in Amman, and more meetings could be in the offing.

“It’s good to be back and I look forward to our conversation. We have a lot to talk about, obviously, as you know,” Kerry told Abbas.

As reporters and photographers were ushered out of the meeting, Kerry turned to Abbas and said: “We had a good long meeting.” It was an apparent reference to his meeting with Netanyahu the night before. “We’re going back.”

Yachimovich’s guarantee of a parliamentary “safety net” is meant as an assurance that despite the proliferation in Netanyahu‘s government of hardliners who oppose a two-state solution, any peace initiative presented by the prime minister will gain the Knesset’s approval.

“The Zionist objective is a Jewish and democratic nation state, which is why we reject the binational state that may come as a result of ongoing stagnation” in peace talks, Yachimovich was quoted by Channel 10 as saying.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Amman, Jordan, on Friday, June 28, 2013 (photo credit: AP/Jacquelyn Martin, Pool)
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, meets with Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas in Amman, Jordan, on Friday, June 28, 2013 (photo credit: AP/Jacquelyn Martin, Pool)

Yachimovich’s supportive tone stood in stark contrast to that of the further-left Meretz party whose leader, MK Zahava Gal-on, on Friday said that a decision on the eve of Kerry’s visit to push forward with the construction of 69 new Jewish homes in an East Jerusalem neighborhood was tantamount to “giving the Americans the finger.”

US State Department officials say that while there are no scheduled plans for a three-way summit with Netanyahu and Abbas during Kerry’s trip, they are confident that both sides are open to negotiations, or at least sitting down together at the same table to restart talks that broke down in 2008.

Labor Party chief Shelly Yachimovich (photo credit: Miriam Alster/Flash90)
Labor Party chief Shelly Yachimovich (photo credit: Miriam Alster/Flash90)

Kerry, they say, will continue to try to find common ground between the two sides that would lead to a re-launching of peace talks. On this trip, Kerry is trying to pin down precisely what conditions Abbas and Netanyahu have for restarting talks and perhaps discuss confidence-building measures.

Abbas has insisted that Israel freeze all settlement activity as a precondition for talks.

Beyond that, Kerry wants to talk about the positive outcomes, such as enhanced economic growth, of a two-state solution. But at the same time, the secretary, who has long-time relationships with officials from both sides, will remind them of what’s at stake if the conflict is left unresolved, they said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

read more:
comments