New Yorker repeats Super Bowl wager, wins $25,000
search

New Yorker repeats Super Bowl wager, wins $25,000

Jona Rechnitz correctly predicted that the Seattle Seahawks would score the first points on a safety

Fans walk near MetLife Stadium before the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game between the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014. (photo credit: AP/Seth Wenig)
Fans walk near MetLife Stadium before the NFL Super Bowl XLVIII football game between the Seattle Seahawks and the Denver Broncos Sunday, Feb. 2, 2014. (photo credit: AP/Seth Wenig)

NEW YORK — Another strange Super Bowl start paid off again for a perennial Jewish sports bettor.

Jona Rechnitz, a 31-year-old real estate owner in New York, made $25,000 for wagering that the Seattle Seahawks would score the first points of Super Bowl XLVIII on a safety.

Rechnitz’s proposition bet paid out at 50-1 odds thanks to an errant snap that flew over the head of Denver Broncos quarterback Peyton Manning on the first play after the opening kickoff.
A copy of a $500 betting slip with the name “Jona” written on top was posted to gossip site TMZ on Monday.

Rechnitz made headlines for winning a similar wager just two years earlier.

In 2012, Rechnitz made $50,000 off a $1,000 gamble when the New York Giants scored on a safety on the New England Patriots’ first possession of Super Bowl XLVI. After that game, Rechnitz pledged to donate the proceeds from his win to charity.

A second betting slip predicting the same outcome of the Denver-Seattle matchup in the amount of $300 bore a time stamp dated within five minutes of Rechnitz. That ticket wwas posted to Instagram by Ari Schwebel, who works at the Rechnitz-owned JSR Capital. Schwebel’s ticket paid $15,000 in earnings.

It is unclear whether Rechnitz placed any other bets on Super Bowl XLVIII, which the Seahawks won, 43-8.

An alumnus of Yeshiva University, Rechnitz has made headlines for his unorthodox Jewish philanthropic efforts spawned from sporting events.

Last May, the New York Daily News reported that Rechnitz schmoozed billionaire Stewart Rahr at a Knicks game for a $100,000 contribution to Yeshiva Ketana in Manhattan and an unnamed Jewish educational program in Israel. Rahr also gave a contribution to the Simon Wiesenthal Center after the game, where Rechnitz claimed Rahr was looking “to get significantly involved.”
According to TMZ, Rechnitz intends to donates this year’s winnings to the Wiesenthal Center and to the foundation in Rahr’s name. (Rechnitz had declined to comment on what he plans to do with his latest sports betting haul, Schwebel’s brother told JTA on Sunday.)

Join us!
A message from the Editor of Times of Israel
David Horovitz

The Times of Israel covers one of the most complicated, and contentious, parts of the world. Determined to keep readers fully informed and enable them to form and flesh out their own opinions, The Times of Israel has gradually established itself as the leading source of independent and fair-minded journalism on Israel, the region and the Jewish world.

We've achieved this by investing ever-greater resources in our journalism while keeping all of the content on our site free.

Unlike many other news sites, we have not put up a paywall. But we would like to invite readers who can afford to do so, and for whom The Times of Israel has become important, to help support our journalism by joining The Times of Israel Community. Join now and for as little as $6 a month you can both help ensure our ongoing investment in quality journalism, and enjoy special status and benefits as a Times of Israel Community member.

Become a member of The Times of Israel Community
read more:
comments