Trump urges early voters with ‘second thoughts’ to recall ballots
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Trump urges early voters with ‘second thoughts’ to recall ballots

Amid FBI review of Clinton email probe, GOP nominee says some with ‘bad case of buyer’s remorse’ can still change their vote

Then Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at the W.L. Zorn Arena November 1, 2016, in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images/AFP)
Then Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally at the W.L. Zorn Arena November 1, 2016, in Eau Claire, Wisconsin. (Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images/AFP)

Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump urged early voters who have had second thoughts about their presidential choice to recall their ballots and change their minds. The call came amid a shock revelation last week by FBI Director James Comey than the closed investigation into whether Democratic nominee Clinton put US secrets at risk by using a private email server while serving as secretary of state would be reviewed after possible new emails were found during a probe into the sexting scandal of Anthony Weiner, the estranged husband of Clinton’s top aide Huma Abedin.

Speaking from the campaign trail in Wisconsin on Tuesday, Trump told supporters Tuesday that Wisconsin was one of four states in which someone who voted early could potentially change it at a county clerk’s office.

Trump said that voters who “are having a bad case of buyer’s remorse” should change their ballot “if you think you made a mistake.”

He said the four states that allow early ballots to be changed are Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota and Pennsylvania. In Wisconsin, voters can change their minds up to three times. The deadline for doing so is Thursday, but changing votes is very rarely done, according to the Early Voting Information Center at Reed College.

The White House contenders clashed from afar on Tuesday — Clinton in battleground Florida and Trump in Pennsylvania and Wisconsin — with the sprint to next Tuesday’s finish well underway as polls showed the race narrowing, with one showing Trump in the lead.

An ABC News/Washington Post tracking poll Tuesday showed Trump leading Clinton by 46 to 45 percent, reflecting other polls that still put Clinton in the lead but suggest the race is close as November 8 looms.

The renewed FBI scrutiny of Clinton’s controversial use of a private email server as secretary of state has excited Republicans and underlined public doubts about the Democrat’s trustworthiness.

Trump boasted about the new numbers as he addressed a raucous crowd — chanting “Lock her up!” and “Drain the swamp!” — in Eau Claire, Wisconsin, before claiming: “The Clintons are the sordid past. And we will be the bright and clean future!”

Trump spent the day relentlessly on message, eschewing wild tangents and political fights in favor of carefully scripted remarks focused on health care and attacks on his opponent. He cautioned that Clinton’s plan to strengthen “Obamacare” would lead to dire consequences, although he offered few specifics about his own plan.

“If we don’t repeal and replace Obamacare, we will destroy American health care forever,” Trump charged in a speech outside Philadelphia.

He also promised, if elected, to call a special session of Congress to replace the law. However, Congress would already be in session when the next president takes office, raising the question of just what he meant.

Also on the attack, Clinton in Florida was introduced by Alicia Machado, a former Miss Universe whom Trump, then the owner of the pageant, publicly humiliated by mocking her post-victory weight gain.

US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton waves to supporters during a campaign rally in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on November 1, 2016. (AFP/ Jewel SAMAD)
US Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton waves to supporters during a campaign rally in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, on November 1, 2016. (AFP/ Jewel SAMAD)

“Can we just stop for a minute and reflect on the absurdity of Donald Trump finding fault with Miss Universe?” Clinton snorted.

Trump’s doctor says he is more than overweight at 236 pounds (107 kilograms).

“What about our girls? What happens to their confidence, their sense of self-worth?” she demanded, warning against a president “who insults more than half the population.”

And she again cited a notorious tape where Trump is overheard on a hot mic bragging about being able to grope women and get away with because he is a star. Trump has faced multiple allegations of sexual misconduct in recent weeks, complicating his efforts to win over women in both parties.

“For my entire life, I’ve been a woman,” Clinton said. “And when I think about what we now know about Donald Trump and what he’s been doing for 30 years, he sure has spent a lot of time demeaning, degrading, insulting and assaulting women.”

Clinton got a boost from President Barack Obama who, at a campaign rally in Ohio, said: “This is a lifetime of calling women pigs and dogs and slobs. The part we’re concerned about is if we start acting like this is normal.”

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