Dozens killed on day of terror in Tunisia, Kuwait and France
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Dozens killed on day of terror in Tunisia, Kuwait and France

Gunmen, bombers strike on three continents; Cameron laments ‘poisonous radicalism’; Netanyahu urges world struggle against ‘dark forces of Islamic extremism’

  • Blood and material on the ground near the area where a terror attack took place in Sousse, Tunisia, Friday June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)
    Blood and material on the ground near the area where a terror attack took place in Sousse, Tunisia, Friday June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)
  • Injured people are treated near the area where a terror attack took place in Sousse, Tunisia, Friday June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)
    Injured people are treated near the area where a terror attack took place in Sousse, Tunisia, Friday June 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Hassene Dridi)
  • Bodies on a Tunisian beach in the immediate aftermath of a June 26, 2015 terrorist attack (YouTube screenshot)
    Bodies on a Tunisian beach in the immediate aftermath of a June 26, 2015 terrorist attack (YouTube screenshot)
  • Investigating police officers work outside the plant where a terrorist attack took place, Friday, June 26, 2015 in Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, southeast of Lyon, France. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
    Investigating police officers work outside the plant where a terrorist attack took place, Friday, June 26, 2015 in Saint-Quentin-Fallavier, southeast of Lyon, France. (AP Photo/Laurent Cipriani)
  • French President Francois Hollande delivers a statement during an EU summit at the EU headquarters in Brussels on June 26, 2015. (AFP PHOTO/ ALAIN JOCARD)
    French President Francois Hollande delivers a statement during an EU summit at the EU headquarters in Brussels on June 26, 2015. (AFP PHOTO/ ALAIN JOCARD)
  • Scene of suspected terror attack in Grenoble, France, June 26, 2015 (Sky News Screenshot)
    Scene of suspected terror attack in Grenoble, France, June 26, 2015 (Sky News Screenshot)
  • Kuwaiti men react at the site of a suicide bombing that targeted the Shiite Al-Imam al-Sadeq mosque during Friday prayers on June 26, 2015, in Kuwait City. (AFP PHOTO / YASSER AL-ZAYYAT)
    Kuwaiti men react at the site of a suicide bombing that targeted the Shiite Al-Imam al-Sadeq mosque during Friday prayers on June 26, 2015, in Kuwait City. (AFP PHOTO / YASSER AL-ZAYYAT)
  • Kuwaiti security personnel and medical staff carry a man on a stretcher at the site of a suicide bombing that targeted the Shiite Al-Imam al-Sadeq mosque after it was targeted by a suicide bombing during Friday prayers on June 26, 2015, in Kuwait City. (AFP PHOTO / STR)
    Kuwaiti security personnel and medical staff carry a man on a stretcher at the site of a suicide bombing that targeted the Shiite Al-Imam al-Sadeq mosque after it was targeted by a suicide bombing during Friday prayers on June 26, 2015, in Kuwait City. (AFP PHOTO / STR)
  • A picture taken from the Turkish side of the border in Suruc, Sanliurfa province, shows Turkish soldiers standing guard (Front) as Syrian Kurds wait behind the barbed wired on the Syrian side after they fled the Syrian town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, on June 26, 2015, a day after a deadly suicide bombing occurred in the town. At least 120 civilians have been killed by the Islamic State group since it entered the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane just over 24 hours ago, a monitoring group said. (AFP PHOTO/BULENT KILIC)
    A picture taken from the Turkish side of the border in Suruc, Sanliurfa province, shows Turkish soldiers standing guard (Front) as Syrian Kurds wait behind the barbed wired on the Syrian side after they fled the Syrian town of Kobane, also known as Ain al-Arab, on June 26, 2015, a day after a deadly suicide bombing occurred in the town. At least 120 civilians have been killed by the Islamic State group since it entered the Syrian Kurdish town of Kobane just over 24 hours ago, a monitoring group said. (AFP PHOTO/BULENT KILIC)
  • Somali soldiers stand near the wreckage at the scene of a suicide car bomb attack which targeted a convoy of foreign officials, in Mogadishu, Somalia on Wednesday, June 24, 2015. (AP Photo)
    Somali soldiers stand near the wreckage at the scene of a suicide car bomb attack which targeted a convoy of foreign officials, in Mogadishu, Somalia on Wednesday, June 24, 2015. (AP Photo)
  • An ambulance waits in Suruc in Turkey's in Sanliurfa province to transport wounded people near the Syrian border town of Kobane on June 25, 2015. (AFP)
    An ambulance waits in Suruc in Turkey's in Sanliurfa province to transport wounded people near the Syrian border town of Kobane on June 25, 2015. (AFP)

A young man pulled a Kalashnikov from a beach umbrella and sprayed gunfire at European sunbathers at a Tunisian resort, killing at least 37 people — one of three deadly attacks Friday from Europe to North Africa to the Middle East that followed a call to violence by Islamic State extremists.

The shootings in the Tunisian resort of Sousse happened at about the same time as a bombing at a Shiite mosque in Kuwait and an attack on a U.S.-owned factory in France that included a beheading. It was unclear if the violence was linked but it came days after the IS militants urged their followers “to make Ramadan a month of calamities for the nonbelievers.” There were also major attacks by Islamic extremists Friday in Somalia and Syria.

Britain’s Prime Minister David Cameron lamented the “poisonous radical narrative that is turning so many young minds,” but added that the terrorism was “not in the name of Islam. Islam is a religion of peace.” The killers, rather, “do it in the name of a twisted, perverted ideology,” he said.

Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said the terror attacks demonstrated that the world is locked in a struggle against “dark forces. The fight against the murderous terrorism of extremist Islam requires unity, the beginning of which is the unequivocal condemnation of the murderers and those who support them,” he said.

Israel’s immigration minister, Ze’ev Elkin, for his part, urged French Jews to “come home! Anti-Semitism is rising, terror is increasing,” he said. “We are prepared to receive with open arms the Jews of France,” he added.

Bodies are covered on a Tunisian beach, in Sousse, Friday June 26, 2015. A young man unfurled an umbrella and pulled out a Kalashnikov, opening fire on European sunbathers in an attack that killed at least 28 people. (Jawhara FM via AP)
Bodies are covered on a Tunisian beach, in Sousse, Friday June 26, 2015. A young man unfurled an umbrella and pulled out a Kalashnikov, opening fire on European sunbathers in an attack that killed at least 28 people. (Jawhara FM via AP)

The attack in Tunisia, the country’s worst ever, comes just months after the March 18 massacre at the national Bardo museum in Tunis that killed 22 people, again mostly tourists, and has called into question the newly elected government’s ability to protect the country.

“Once again, cowardly and traitorous hands have struck Tunisia, targeting its security and that of its children and visitors,” President Beji Caid Essebsi told reporters at the RIU Imperial Marhaba hotel, near the beach rampage site.

Essebsi promised “painful but necessary” measures, adding: “No country is safe from terrorism, and we need a global strategy of all democratic countries.”

Rafik Chelli, the secretary of state of the Interior Ministry, told The Associated Press that the attack was carried out by a young student not previously known to authorities. At least 36 people were reported wounded in the shooting spree, which ended when the gunman was shot to death by police.

Kuwaiti security personnel and medical staff carry a man on a stretcher at the site of a suicide bombing that targeted the Shiite Al-Imam al-Sadeq mosque after it was targeted by a suicide bombing during Friday prayers on June 26, 2015, in Kuwait City. (AFP PHOTO / STR)
Kuwaiti security personnel and medical staff carry a man on a stretcher at the site of a suicide bombing that targeted the Shiite Al-Imam al-Sadeq mosque after it was targeted by a suicide bombing during Friday prayers on June 26, 2015, in Kuwait City. (AFP PHOTO / STR)

The Islamic State group claimed responsibility for the suicide bombing at the Shiite mosque in Kuwait City that killed at least 27 people and wounded scores of other worshippers at midday prayers — the first such attack in the mostly quiet and relatively secure Gulf Arab nation in more than two decades.

In southeastern France, a man with ties to Islamic radicals rammed a car into a gas factory, touching off an explosion that injured two people. Authorities arriving at the site made a grisly discovery: the severed head of the driver’s employer was found hanging at the plant entrance.

Special forces of France's Research and Intervention Brigades (BRI) leave the building housing the apartment of a man suspected of carrying out an attack in Saint-Priest near Lyon on June 26, 2015. (AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE DESMAZES)
Special forces of France’s Research and Intervention Brigades (BRI) leave the building housing the apartment of a man suspected of carrying out an attack in Saint-Priest near Lyon on June 26, 2015. (AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE DESMAZES)

The suspect, Yassine Salhi, was seized by an alert firefighter, authorities said, and French President Francois Hollande said the attacker’s intention had been to cause an explosion. A security alert for the southeast region was raised to its highest level for the next three days, and the U.S. Embassy in Paris warned American citizens to be vigilant.

In an audio recording released Tuesday, the Islamic State called on its supporters to increase attacks during Ramadan and “be keen on waging invasion in this eminent month and commit martyrdom.”

In Britain, police said they were tightening security at major events after the attacks in France, Kuwait and Tunisia, including for the weekend events of Armed Forces Day and the Pride London gay and lesbian festival.

The attacks were condemned by the United Nations, the U.S., Israel and others.

“We stand with these nations as they respond to attacks on their soil today,” the White House said. Pentagon spokesman Col. Steve Warren added it was “too soon to tell whether or not these various and far-flung attacks were coordinated centrally or whether they were coincidental.”

The carnage in Tunisia began on the beach, where tourists described hearing what sounded like fireworks and then running for their lives when they realized it was gunfire. Video of the aftermath showed medics using beach chairs as stretchers to carry away people in swimsuits.

“He had a parasol in his hand. He went down to put it in the sand and then he took out his Kalashnikov and began shooting wildly,” Chelli said of the gunman.

He then entered the pool area of the Imperial Marhaba hotel before moving inside, killing people as he went.

British tourist Gary Pine told AP he was on the beach with his wife around noon when heard the shooting. They shouted for their son to get out of the water, grabbed their bag and ran for the hotel. Their son told them he saw someone shot on the beach.

There was “sheer panic” at the hotel, Pine said. “There were a lot of concerned people, a few people in tears with panic and a few people — older guests — they’d turned their ankles or there was a few little minor injuries and nicks and scrapes.”

Elizabeth O’Brien, an Irish tourist who was with her two sons, told Irish Radio she was on the beach when the shooting began.

“I thought, ‘Oh my God. It sounds like gunfire,’ so I just ran to the sea to my children and grabbed our things” before fleeing to their hotel room, she said.

The Health Ministry said the 37 dead included Tunisians, British, Germans and Belgians, without giving a breakdown.

British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond. (YouTube/U.S. Department of State)
British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond. (YouTube/U.S. Department of State)

British Foreign Secretary Philip Hammond says at least five Britons were killed but expected to toll to rise because a high proportion of the dead were believed to be British.

Since overthrowing its secular dictator in 2011, Tunisia has been plagued by terrorist attacks, although only recently have they targeted the tourism sector, which makes up nearly 15 percent of GDP.

“The Foreign Office will declare the summer effectively over for Tunisia, and it will destroy — besides the lives taken — the tens of thousands of livelihoods who depend on tourism for a living,” said Simon Calder, a London-based travel commentator. Nearly half a million Britons visited Tunisia in 2014.

The attacks are also a blow to Tunisia’s image as a stable, democratic nation emerging from its revolution in 2011, said Jonathan Hill, a professor of Defense Studies at King’s College in London.

“The terrorists are attacking Tunisia’s reputation,” he said. “Not just as a safe and welcoming destination for Western holidaymakers, but as the one real success story to emerge out of the Arab Spring.”

International police agency Interpol offered investigative help in the wake of Friday’s violence. Interpol Secretary-General Juergen Stock said the attacks “show the truly global dimension to current terrorist threats.”

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Immigration Minister Ze'ev Elkin. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Immigration Minister Ze’ev Elkin. (Miriam Alster/Flash90)

Meanwhile, an Israeli TV report said Islamic State and Al-Qaeda are bent on sparking a continued wave of terrorism in Europe and the Middle East over the rest of the summer. Channel 10 quoted unnamed Western intelligence sources issuing the warning hours after the series of terrorist attacks.

Noting that an Islamic State spokesman, Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, called on Tuesday for Muslims to engage in jihad and become martyrs during the current holy month of Ramadan, the Channel 10 TV report quoted the sources saying that IS and al-Qaeda are both encouraging “lone wolf” attacks and working to orchestrate more sophisticated strikes.

Friday’s attacks — in France, Tunisia, Kuwait and Somalia, as well as ongoing killings in Syria — were likely not coordinated, but underlined Islamist groups’ determined encouragement of terrorism, Israeli commentators said.

The TV report noted that IS, which claimed responsibility for several of Friday’s attacks, is marking a year since it declared a caliphate last June 29.

Highlighting a specific threat to Israel, the report quoted the intelligence sources warning that IS “intends to carry out major attacks from the Sinai,” across the border with Egypt, and possibly from the Golan Heights, across the border with Syria, where it has a heavy presence.

 

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