Funeral for car attacker to go ahead after family accepts limitations
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Funeral for car attacker to go ahead after family accepts limitations

Abdelrahman al-Shaludi’s relatives had left corpse with police in protest against court order to restrict attendance, but accepted body Sunday night

Lazar Berman is a former breaking news editor at The Times of Israel.

Abdelrahman al-Shaludi, who killed two and injured seven others after he rammed his vehicle into pedestrians at a Jerusalem Light Rail station, October 23, 2014. (photo credit: Channel 2)
Abdelrahman al-Shaludi, who killed two and injured seven others after he rammed his vehicle into pedestrians at a Jerusalem Light Rail station, October 23, 2014. (photo credit: Channel 2)

The family of a Palestinian man who killed two people in a terrorist attack in Jerusalem Wednesday, before being shot by police, said they would go ahead with his funeral Sunday, after initially balking in protest over police restrictions on the funeral.

Abdelrahman al-Shaludi rammed his car into a crowd at a Jerusalem Light Rail stop last week, killing a three-month-old girl and an Ecuadoran woman and injuring seven others, and was shot while trying to flee.

Police had feared his funeral would add to already inflamed tensions in the capital, and a court ordered that only 20 people — whose names had been approved — be allowed to attend his funeral in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of Silwan, and the funeral would have to be at night.

His family said Sunday evening they would accept his body, AFP reported.

The funeral was set to take place late Sunday night at a Muslim cemetery near the Old City of Jerusalem, after the family agreed to the court’s terms, Israel Radio reported.

Shaludi’s family had earlier threatened they would not receive the body if strict limits on the number of mourners at the funeral remained in place.

“The deceased deserves a great and dignified funeral,” family spokesman Abad Shaludi told the Israeli media outlet Ynet. “We will not agree to accept the body with the [funeral] conditions set by the police. If they leave the conditions in place, then it’s better to leave the body with them.”

Jawad Siyyam, an activist from Silwan, where the Shaludis reside, alleged that Israel had threatened the family they would bury him on their own if they did not accept the conditions.

His family rejected those terms, but eventually the two sides agreed 70 people could attend, according to Siyyam.

A police spokeswoman confirmed the body would be handed over, but denied the quota had grown to 70 participants.

Shaludi — who, according to Israel, was a Hamas activist from Silwan — was originally set to be buried in a Muslim cemetery near the Old City’s Lions’ Gate at 10 p.m. Saturday after a court authorized a service to be attended by a maximum of 80 people, for fear the event could turn into a violent protest.

However, police postponed the burial and rescheduled it for a time window between 11 p.m. and midnight with only 20 mourners, whose names would have to be submitted to police in advance, allowed to attend.

Tensions are already running high in Jerusalem, where police and officials have vowed to crack down on several days of clashes between Palestinian protesters and Israeli forces.

In the wake of the terror attack Wednesday night, riots were reported in several East Jerusalem neighborhoods.

Sunday saw scattered incidents of rocks and Molotov cocktails being thrown at Israelis in the capital and West Bank.

Police deployed “at least 400-500” extra police units “to prevent and respond to any incident,” police spokesman Micky Rosenfeld said.

Earlier in the evening, demonstrators marching to Shaludi’s home threw rocks at policemen, who responded with crowd-dispersing methods, according to the Israel Police.

Police arrested several suspects.

The protests came as a second victim of the Wednesday terror attack succumbed to her wounds, raising the death toll to two.

Also Sunday evening, Palestinians threw four Molotov cocktails at an Israeli bus traveling near the city of Halhul, north of Hebron. No injuries were reported.

Chaya Zissel Braun, a 3-month-old baby killed in a terrorist attack in Jerusalem on October 22, 2014 (Channel 2 Screenshot)
Chaya Zissel Braun, a 3-month-old baby killed in a terrorist attack in Jerusalem on October 22, 2014. (Channel 2 screenshot)

Tensions have been high since June, when three Israeli teenagers were kidnapped and killed by Palestinian terrorists in the West Bank. Jewish extremists retaliated by kidnapping and killing a Palestinian teenager in East Jerusalem, sparking riots. The kidnappings set off a series of events that led to the 50-day Gaza war.

Times of Israel staff and news agencies contributed to this report.

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