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IDF levels home of Palestinian who killed 2 Israelis in Old City attack

Muhannad Halabi, who stabbed Nehemiah Lavi and Aharon Banita to death on October 3, was shot dead by police on site

Illustrative: Bulldozers of the Jerusalem Municipality destroy a Palestinian house in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of A-Tur on March 26, 2014. (Sliman Khader/Flash90)
Illustrative: Bulldozers of the Jerusalem Municipality destroy a Palestinian house in the East Jerusalem neighborhood of A-Tur on March 26, 2014. (Sliman Khader/Flash90)

Israeli security forces on Friday demolished the home of a Palestinian terrorist who killed two Israelis in Jerusalem’s Old City in October.

IDF and Border Police troops took part in leveling the home of Muhannad Halabi in the West Bank village of Surda, near Ramallah.

Halabi, a 19-year-old law student, was shot dead by Israeli police on October 3 after stabbing Rabbi Nehemiah Lavi and Aharon Banita, and injuring Bennett’s wife and their two-year-old son in the Old City.

Banita’s wife was in serious condition and their two-year-old baby was lightly wounded.

The municipality of Surda-Abu Qash announced that it would name a street for Muhannad Halabi, Palestinian Media Watch reported in October, citing an article by Donia Al-Watan, a Palestinian news agency.

Earlier this week, IDF troops entered the Jabel Mukaber neighborhood of East Jerusalem Monday morning in order to destroy the homes of two terrorists who carried out attacks against Israelis earlier this fall, the army said.

On October 13, three residents of the neighborhood carried out two separate deadly attacks in Jerusalem.

The home of Bahaa Allyan was knocked down on Monday morning, while the home of Alaa Abu Jamal was sealed off with concrete. The army and police blocked off some entrances to the neighborhood before beginning to destroy the two homes.

The High Court of Justice approved the demolition orders for the houses on December 23.

The practice of demolishing the family homes of terrorists has been criticized by nongovernmental groups, but officials have defended its use as a deterrent against future attacks.

Critics claim that, in addition to being a form of collective punishment, house demolitions could motivate family members of terrorists to launch attacks themselves.

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