Jordan’s king calls Abbas after hospital visit
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Jordan’s king calls Abbas after hospital visit

Palestinian Authority president and Abdullah II discuss Temple Mount, Jerusalem; agree to meet soon in Amman

King Abdullah II of Jordan, left, welcomes Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas after his arrival at the Royal Palace in Amman, Jordan, in March, 2013. (AP Photo/ Raad Adayleh)
King Abdullah II of Jordan, left, welcomes Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas after his arrival at the Royal Palace in Amman, Jordan, in March, 2013. (AP Photo/ Raad Adayleh)

Jordan’s King Abdullah II phoned Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas on Sunday to inquire about his health after the Palestinian leader was hospitalized on Saturday.

A tweet from the king’s official account said that, “His Majesty King Abdullah II, in a phone call, checks on Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas’ health.”

During the call, the two also discussed the developments on the Temple Mount and Jerusalem and agreed to meet soon in Jordan’s capital, Amman, according to the Kan broadcaster.

Doctors and Palestinian officials said the 82-year-old Abbas was suffering from exhaustion, leading him to undergo medical checks at a West Bank hospital over the weekend.

One physician said that Abbas suffered from an inflammation of the stomach, aggravated by stress.

All spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss Abbas’s health with the media.

The hospital visit came after two weeks of sharp tensions with Israel amid Palestinian protests over security measures at Jerusalem’s Temple Mount, known to Muslims as Haram al-Sharif (Noble Sanctuary).

Israel installed new security measures at the compound after the fatal terror attack on July 14, in which three Arab Israeli gunmen killed two Israeli police officers with weapons they smuggled on to the site. Last week, amid fierce pressure from the Palestinians, Israel removed the metal detectors and cameras around the holy site.

Abbas’s latest health issues revived the debate over who will succeed him.

In power since 2005, he has refused to groom a successor. In the current disarray in Palestinian political institutions, there is no clear path toward choosing one.

Associated Press contributed to this report.

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