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Global virus death toll at 1.71 million; nearly 78 million infected

The novel coronavirus has killed at least 1,718,209 people since the outbreak emerged in China last December, according to a tally from official sources compiled by AFP at 11:00 GMT on Wednesday.

At least 77,992,300 cases of coronavirus have been registered. Of these, at least 49,481,100 are now considered recovered.

The tallies, using data collected by AFP from national authorities and information from the World Health Organization (WHO), probably reflect only a fraction of the actual number of infections.

Many countries are testing only symptomatic or the most serious cases.

On Tuesday, 14,037 new deaths and 686,758 new cases were recorded worldwide.

Based on latest reports, the countries with the most new deaths were United States with 3,030 new deaths, followed by Brazil with 968 and Germany with 962.

The United States is the worst-affected country with 322,849 deaths from 18,237,190 cases. At least 6,298,082 people have been declared recovered.

After the US, the hardest-hit countries are Brazil with 188,259 deaths from 7,318,821 cases, India with 146,444 deaths from 10,099,066 cases, Mexico with 119,495 deaths from 1,338,426 cases, and Italy with 69,842 deaths from 1,977,370 cases.

The country with the highest number of deaths compared to its population is Belgium with 162 fatalities per 100,000 inhabitants, followed by Slovenia with 116, Bosnia-Herzegovina with 116, Italy 116, Peru 113.

Europe overall has 529,976 deaths from 24,485,509 cases, Latin America and the Caribbean 489,366 deaths from 14,827,483 infections, and the United States and Canada 337,248 deaths from 18,757,054 cases.

Asia has reported 212,715 deaths from 13,526,275 cases, the Middle East 87,702 deaths from 3,816,525 cases, Africa 60,258 deaths from 2,548,663 cases, and Oceania 944 deaths from 30,792 cases.

As a result of corrections by national authorities or late publication of data, the figures updated over the past 24 hours may not correspond exactly to the previous day’s tallies.

AFP

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