July to be hottest month on record as UN warns of ‘global boiling’

A Canadair firefighting airplane sprays water on a fire in Gennadi, on the southern part of the Greek island of Rhodes on July 25, 2023, on July 25, 2023, during a wildfire (Spyros Bakalis/AFP)
A Canadair firefighting airplane sprays water on a fire in Gennadi, on the southern part of the Greek island of Rhodes on July 25, 2023, on July 25, 2023, during a wildfire (Spyros Bakalis/AFP)

July is on track to be the hottest month in recorded history, scientists confirm, as UN chief Antonio Guterres warns Earth has moved into an “era of global boiling.”

Searing heat intensified by global warming has affected tens of millions of people in parts of Europe, Asia and North America this month, combining with fierce wildfires that have scorched across Canada and parts of southern Europe.

“Climate change is here. It is terrifying. And it is just the beginning,” says Guterres, urging immediate and bold action to cut planet-heating emissions.

“The era of global warming has ended; the era of global boiling has arrived.”

With the first three weeks of July already registering global average temperatures above any comparative period, the World Meteorological Organization and Europe’s Copernicus Climate Change Service (C3S) say it is “extremely likely” that July 2023 will be the hottest month on records going back to the 1940s.

Carlo Buontempo, Director of C3S, says the temperatures in the period have been “remarkable,” with an anomaly so large that scientists are confident the record has been shattered even before the month ends.

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