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It’s winter and the Jewish children in Ukraine are freezing

As Russia ruthlessly attacks Ukraine, thousands have gone days without electricity, warm food & without a roof over their head. Together we can provide them with a home cooked meal

Children and their companions from an orphanage in Odesa, Ukraine, wait for room allocation after their arrival at a hotel in Berlin, on Friday, March 4, 2022. More than 100 Jewish refugee children who were evacuated from a foster care home in war-torn Ukraine and made their way across Europe by bus have arrived in Berlin. (AP Photo/Steffi Loos)
Children and their companions from an orphanage in Odesa, Ukraine, wait for room allocation after their arrival at a hotel in Berlin, on Friday, March 4, 2022. More than 100 Jewish refugee children who were evacuated from a foster care home in war-torn Ukraine and made their way across Europe by bus have arrived in Berlin. (AP Photo/Steffi Loos)

Since the onset of the war in February 2022, the Shul in Podil , Kyiv has been busier than ever. The Shul, which serves as the Main Synagogue of Kyiv and the seat of the Chief Rabbi, has become a haven for Jewish refugees from all over Ukraine. People who’ve had to run and find shelter now have a roof over their heads on the shul campus, kosher meals three times a day, minyanim, Shabbos and Yom Tov all taken care of.

Around October, the beginning of Sukkos of 2022, the Russians began to bomb Ukrainian infrastructure – including the electrical grid. As a result, thousands are still left without heat, without water and without electricity. The Shul in Kyiv has set up a generator so those in need have where to go. Freezing families come to recharge, hungry children come for a filling meal, all amid the sounds of Torah and tefillah which has never stopped.

There is an Assisted Living facility for Holocaust survivors so the elderly are ensured proper care, and a school for children which has reopened recently. All of these places have armed security guards, which during a time of war, is more important – and more expensive – than ever.

People in Ukraine are feeling lost, with no place to go and no place to call home. To fill this need, in April 2022, a DP Camp has been opened in Budapest where Yiddishkeit is thriving. Hundreds of families have fled to Budapest where they are well taken care of and can make a new life for themselves. The refugees receive three meals a day, they have a shul where they can pray and learn along with a school for the young ones. Youth groups and women’s groups meet frequently and give much needed strength and hope to people who need it.

Donate now and be a part of this effort to provide a safe haven and fresh start for displaced families. Every donation counts and can make a significant impact on the lives of these refugees. Together, we can make a difference.

Donate now

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