Syrian forces recapture Palmyra from IS for second time
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Syrian forces recapture Palmyra from IS for second time

Backed by Russians, Assad’s military pushes terrorists out of ruined ancient city

Smoke billows in the background as Syrian regime fighters advance to retake the ancient city of Palmyra, from Islamic State (IS) group fighters on March 2, 2017. (AFP/ STR)
Smoke billows in the background as Syrian regime fighters advance to retake the ancient city of Palmyra, from Islamic State (IS) group fighters on March 2, 2017. (AFP/ STR)

Syrian army forces, aided by Russian jets, have completed the recapture of the iconic ancient city of Palmyra from the Islamic State group, the Kremlin said Thursday.

Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu informed President Vladimir Putin of the completion of the operation, spokesman Dmitry Peskov told Russian news agencies.

A monitoring group following the conflict told AFP that while the jihadists had pulled out of Palmyra, Syrian regime forces had yet to move into the entire city.

“IS has fully withdrawn from Palmyra, but the Syrian army is still clearing neighborhoods of mines and has not spread out into the whole city yet,” Syrian Observatory for Human Rights head Rami Abdel Rahman told AFP.

The historic oasis city has traded hands several times during the six-year civil war and become a symbol of IS’s wanton destruction of cultural heritage in areas under its control.

The jihadist group first seized Palmyra in May 2015 and began to systematically destroy and loot the UNESCO world heritage site’s monuments and temples. IS fighters were driven out in March 2016 but recaptured the city last December.

Bolstered by Russian air strikes and ground troops, Syrian government forces have been battling through the desert for weeks to reach Palmyra.

By Thursday morning, IS had withdrawn to residential neighborhoods in the east of the city, the Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said.

Palmyra’s ancient ruins have long been listed by UNESCO as a world heritage site. Before IS entered the city in May 2015, they boasted temples, colonnaded alleys and elaborately decorated tombs that were among the best preserved classical monuments in the Middle East.

But the jihadists launched a campaign of destruction against them, the scale of which was fully revealed when government forces briefly retook the city with Russian support last year.

An Islamic State operative smashing statues in the Syrian city of Palmyra, July 2, 2015. (screen capture)
An Islamic State operative smashing statues in the Syrian city of Palmyra, July 2, 2015. (screen capture)

Satellite imagery has shown that IS has demolished more monuments since it recaptured Palmyra from government forces in December. Archaeologists have decried what they say is extensive damage to the city’s famed ancient ruins.

Restored Palmyra artifacts back in Syria

Earlier this week, two badly damaged funeral busts recently recovered from Palmyra by Syrian troops were restored in Italy and returned to Syria.

The rare busts that were badly disfigured with what appeared to be hammer blows, were restored by art conservationists in Rome, the country’s antiquities director said Wednesday.

The director of Syria's Antiquities Department Maamun Abdul-Karim shows one of two rare busts rescued from the Islamic State group in the ancient city of Palmyra and restored in Italy, after they were returned to Syria, at the National Museum in Damascus on March 1, 2017. (Louai Beshara / AFP)
The director of Syria’s Antiquities Department Maamun Abdul-Karim shows one of two rare busts rescued from the Islamic State group in Palmyra and restored in Italy, after they were returned to Syria, at the National Museum in Damascus on March 1, 2017. (Louai Beshara / AFP)

“The two statues were returned to Syria on Tuesday and added to the 400 artifacts that were rescued from Palmyra,” Maamun Abdul Karim told AFP.

They are perhaps the only such artifacts to have left the desert site without being stolen.

Restorers used a 3-D printer to generate replicas of the missing parts of the busts, which date from the 2nd or 3rd centuries AD They attached the replacement parts with magnets.

The restoration efforts are also being hailed as a tribute to Khaled al-Assad, former head of antiquities at Palmyra who was murdered by IS in 2015 at the age of 82.

AFP reporters saw the two statues — one of a woman and the other of a man — being transported from the Damascus museum to an undisclosed location on Wednesday.

Abdul Karim said the restoration of the busts “is the first real, visible positive step that the international community has taken to protect Syrian heritage.”

A picture taken at the National Museum in Damascus on March 1, 2017 shows a rare bust rescued from the Islamic State group in the ancient city of Palmyra awaiting to be restored, after it was returned to Syria. (AFP PHOTO / Louai Beshara)
A picture taken at the National Museum in Damascus on March 1, 2017 shows a rare bust rescued from the Islamic State group in the ancient city of Palmyra awaiting to be restored, after it was returned to Syria. (AFP PHOTO / Louai Beshara)

“This is part of cultural diplomacy, which does not prevent coordination among the people of different countries to combat extremism and barbarism,” Abdul Karim said.

“In the end, Syrian heritage is human heritage,” he told AFP.

On one, the upper part of the face had been destroyed, but the team managed to recreate the missing portion using a synthetic nylon powder and a 3-D printer, a technique that had never been used for such a restoration.

The new piece was attached to the bust with powerful magnets, “which makes it completely removable, in line with the principle that all restoration work must be completely reversible”, said Antonio Iaccarino, one of the restorers.

“What the Islamic State has destroyed, we have rebuilt,” he said. “Through culture, we also wage an ideological battle.”

Times of Israel staff contributed to this report.

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