Arab media is taking a rest from Egypt for the day in favor of Syria. The country tops the Arab news Tuesday, with headlines focusing on opposition discussions surrounding the “day after” Assad.

“Fighting intensifies at the gates of Damascus, and calls to transfer the Syrian issue to the Hague,” reads the headline of A-Sharq Al-Awsat, referring to a suggestion by UN Human Rights Chief Navi Pillay. The article features a photo of young Syrian protesters in Idlib wearing T-shirts with the names of Syrian cities currently under attack by the Assad regime.

London-based daily Al-Hayat focuses on the opposition gathering that took place in Cairo Monday to discuss Syria in the post-Assad era and bring about the government’s downfall. On Tuesday the participants are expected to produce an “inclusive national charter,” Al-Hayat reports.

‘There is certainly a mistake here, and if anyone is to blame it is the Syrian revolution sympathizers’

“The Syrian opposition tries to end its fragmentation at the Cairo meeting,” reads the headline of a skeptical Al-Quds Al-Arabi, based in London. A Syrian oppositionist from within Syria, Haitham Manaa, criticizes the Cairo gathering for representing only exiled members of the opposition. In an interview with the daily, he calls the attendees “television personalities with no influence inside Syria,” and says domestic opposition members should have been better represented at the conference.

Friends of the Syrian opposition have not managed to convince decision makers, particularly in the United States, of the importance of military intervention in Syria, writes A-Sharq Al-Awsat editor-in-chief Tareq Homayed.

“There is certainly a mistake here, and if anyone is to blame it is the Syrian revolution sympathizers. There is a mistake in the way they’re engaging the Damascus tyrant, and the biggest mistake is the lack of leadership and claiming responsibility. The danger in Assad’s remaining, or in the collapse of Syria, will harm everyone without exception,” writes Homayed.

Iran threatens to close Strait of Hormuz

Iranian draft legislation to close the Strait of Hormuz in response to a European oil embargo that went into effect July 1 is making big headlines in Arabic dailies Tuesday.

The lead editorial in Al-Quds Al-Arabi claims that Iran does not need parliamentary consent to close the Strait of Hormuz, and the threat to do so is merely part of the psychological warfare taking place between Iran and the West.

“The threat to close the Strait of Hormuz… means a declaration of war because Western countries, led by the United States… will not allow such a move to go forward as it will serve a deadly blow to the West’s faltering economy, raising oil prices to 200 dollars a barrel, if not more.”

On Monday Iran also began a military maneuver mimicking a missile counterstrike on Israeli and American targets if Iran’s nuclear sites are hit. Dubai-based station Al-Arabiya displays a TV graphic of the military missile bases set up for the maneuver by Iran in the western desert.

The threat to close the Strait of Hormuz… means a declaration of war, because Western countries, led by the US… will not allow such a move to go forward as it will serve a deadly blow to the West’s faltering economy, raising oil prices to 200 dollars a barrel, if not more’

Strategic expert Mustafa Al-Aani tells the station that the new sanctions imposed on Iran will deny it 80% of its oil income. Aani says Iran’s supposed capabilities have never been confirmed by a third party, and are entirely based on Iranian reports. Aani claims that the Iranian missiles are inaccurate and cannot target specific sites within Israel.

Why can’t Iraqi women lose weight?

 

 

Iraqi women, like many of their counterparts in the Arab world, suffer from excess weight, claims Saudi-owned news site Elaph. However, unlike other Arab women, Iraqis are more limited in their weight-loss options due to cultural reasons. Women’s exercise is frowned upon in Iraq, and the women also have no time to devote to exercise since family and child-rearing must come first.

Two additional factors add to the women’s weight problem: a lack of public parks where women can exercise and the high-fat content of Iraqi food.