Netanyahu arrives in Moscow for talks on Iranian ‘terror,’ Syrian peace
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Netanyahu arrives in Moscow for talks on Iranian ‘terror,’ Syrian peace

On whirlwind visit, PM to tell Putin that Golan must not be part of any solution in Syrian peace talks, seeks to counter Tehran's entrenchment in region

Raphael Ahren is the diplomatic correspondent at The Times of Israel.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (center) meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow (right) on Thursday, March 9, 2017 (Israeli embassy in Moscow)
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu (center) meets with Russian President Vladimir Putin in Moscow (right) on Thursday, March 9, 2017 (Israeli embassy in Moscow)

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu arrived in Moscow early Thursday afternoon for his third meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin in a year. He was greeted at the airport by Russian Deputy Foreign Minister Mikhail Bogdanov.

On the tarmac, Bogdanov, Moscow’s point man for the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, warmly embraced his Israeli guest.

Netanyahu’s whirlwind one-day visit will focus on Russia’s involvement in the Syrian civil war, with the Israeli leader expected to urge the Kremlin not to allow Iran, Russia’s ally in supporting Syrian strongman Bashar Assad, a permanent foothold in the country.

“The prime minister will express Israel’s strong opposition to the presence of Iranian forces, and those of its proxies, on our northern border and in the Mediterranean Sea in the context of the talks on a settlement of any kind,” his office said in a statement. “The prime minister also intends to reiterate to President Putin the fact that the [Syrian-held] Golan Heights is not part of the discussion on any outline.”

Netanyahu and Putin were also expected to discuss the ongoing military coordination between the two countries to ensure their forces don’t clash over Syria’s skies.

“This is a very important meeting for the security of Israel,” Netanyahu said Tuesday evening. “Victory over the terrorism of the Islamic State cannot lead to an upsurge in terrorism by Iran and its proxies. We will not exchange terrorism for terrorism.”

A source close to Netanyahu reportedly said Wednesday, hours before he arrived at the Kremlin, that “Moscow allows us to act against Hezbollah in Syrian airspace.”

Russian and Israeli authorities denied the report. “There is just no such agreement or coordination,” a senior official in Jerusalem told The Times of Israel.

Israeli officials have long accused the Iranian Revolutionary Guards of trying to build an anti-Israel front on the Syrian Golan, alongside Hezbollah forces and local Druze opposed to Israel. Netanyahu has sought Russia’s help in seeking to thwart the attempts of Iran and its terrorist proxy Hezbollah to use Syria as a base from which to attack Israel.

PM Netanyahu arrives at Moscow airport ahead of a meeting with President Putin of Russia, March 9, 2016 (courtesy)
PM Netanyahu arrives at Moscow airport ahead of a meeting with President Putin of Russia, March 9, 2016 (courtesy)

Last week, Chagai Tzuriel, the director-general of the Intelligence Ministry, told The Times of Israel that keeping Iran and Hezbollah from getting a foothold on the Golan was at the top of the agenda for Israel’s security apparatus.

“Since Russia began intervening in the Syrian war a year ago, Russia became an important actor in Syria itself,” said Eyal Zisser, a Middle East expert from Tel Aviv University. “But of course this intervention has to do with the strategic interest of Israel. Russia became a neighborhood country, so you need to coordinate, you need to establish open channels of communication in order to ensure that no accidents will occur along the border.”

Russia partnered with Iran to assure the survival of the Syrian regime, which gives Netanyahu and Putin much to discuss, Zisser said, especially as the civil war appears to be at a turning point. Forces of President Basher Assad have recently recaptured the city of Aleppo from the rebels and it is currently unclear what the Syria-Russia-Iran alliance will attempt to achieve next.

File: Russian President Vladimir Putin, center, shakes hand with Syrian President Bashar Assad as Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, looks on in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, October 20, 2015. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP, File)
File: Russian President Vladimir Putin, center, shakes hand with Syrian President Bashar Assad as Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, right, looks on in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, October 20, 2015. (Alexei Druzhinin, Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP, File)

“The future of Syria might be dictated by Russians, Turks and Iranians. And Israel probably wants to share with the Russians its ideas and concerns about such a process,” Zisser said.

The Golan Heights, which are close to Damascus, pose a particular headache for Israel, he added.

“The Syrian regime, with the support of the Iranians and Hezbollah, might want to make a comeback and recaptured those territories which were lost several years ago to the rebels,” Zisser predicted.

An IDF Merkava tank drives near the border with Syria on the Golan Heights, on November 28, 2016. (AFP PHOTO/JACK GUEZ)
An IDF Merkava tank drives near the border with Syria on the Golan Heights, on November 28, 2016. (AFP PHOTO/JACK GUEZ)

Forces affiliated with the Islamic State group are making territorial gains on the Golan Heights’ south, which also worries Jerusalem, although they are careful not to engage in a direct confrontation with Israel, he said. “They have other priorities, such as fighting each other and fighting the regime. But IS on the border is not something Israel is happy with.”

Netanyahu, who flew to Moscow in a small jet, taking with him no press and a small number of advisers, is expected to return to Israel on Thursday evening, leaving Russia immediately after his meeting with Putin. He is accompanied by Minister Ze’ev Elkin — who also serves as his personal translator — acting national security adviser Brig.-Gen. (ret.) Jacob Nagel, his chief of staff staff Yoav Horowitz, his Military Secretary Brig.-Gen. Eliezer Toledano and the head of the IDF’s intelligence branch Herzl Halevy.

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