Amazon removes shirts with notorious photo of Nazi executing Jew
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Amazon removes shirts with notorious photo of Nazi executing Jew

Retail giant takes down items after being contacted by Israel’s Channel 12; sellers boasted purchasers would ‘stand out from the crowd’

A photograph known as "The Last Jew in Vinnitsa" taken during the Holocaust in Ukraine showing a Jewish man near the town of Vinnitsa about to be shot dead by a member of the Nazis' Einsatzgruppe. (Public Domain)
A photograph known as "The Last Jew in Vinnitsa" taken during the Holocaust in Ukraine showing a Jewish man near the town of Vinnitsa about to be shot dead by a member of the Nazis' Einsatzgruppe. (Public Domain)

Amazon has removed an assortment of clothes sold on its UK site emblazoned with a notorious Holocaust photo in which a Jew in Ukraine is kneeling in front of a mass grave as a Nazi officer points a gun to his head, moments before shooting him, Channel 12 news reported on Saturday.

The retail giant took down the items plastered with the photo, known as “The Last Jew in Vinnitsa,” after it was contacted by the Israeli TV network.

The items included a hoodie, a t-shirt and a sweater pullover in various colors, all with the same Holocaust picture on them.

In the description of the items, the sellers from “Harma Art” wrote, “Choose from our great collection of authentic designs and stand out from the crowd!”

This was not the first time items charged to be anti-Semitic were sold on Amazon’s site.

Just last month, the Central Council of Jews in Germany denounced the online retail giant for allowing the sale of anti-Semitic books and pro-Nazi merchandise, calling for the practice to immediately stop.

It highlighted books such as “The Jew as World Parasite” which was listed on the site for 20 euros ($22.50), and “Judas: The World Enemy,” available for 10 euros ($11).

In March 2017, Amazon UK removed three books that denied the Holocaust after requests from Yad Vashem and a UK Jewish group.

The four titles were: “Holocaust: The Greatest Lie Ever Told,” by Eleanor Wittakers; “The Hoax of the Twentieth Century: The Case Against the Presumed Extermination of European Jewry,” by Arthur R. Butz and “Did Six Million Really Die?” by Richard Harwood.

On Wednesday, Amazon launched a new webpage in Hebrew aimed at recruiting local sellers, as it expands its Israeli operations.

An Amazon fulfillment center processes orders in Aurora, Colorado, May 3, 2018. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)
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