Anti-Semitism, most of it online, on rise in Czech Republic — report
search

Anti-Semitism, most of it online, on rise in Czech Republic — report

Hate primarily manifests itself on far-right, anti-liberal and pro-Russian media sites; levels of anti-Semitism still low compared to other European countries

In this file picture taken on Wednesday, April 28, 2010, some of 92 tombstones that vandals knocked over sit on the ground of a Jewish cemetery in the village of Pristoupim, Czech Republic (AP Photo/Petr David Josek/File)
In this file picture taken on Wednesday, April 28, 2010, some of 92 tombstones that vandals knocked over sit on the ground of a Jewish cemetery in the village of Pristoupim, Czech Republic (AP Photo/Petr David Josek/File)

PRAGUE — The Jewish community in the Czech Republic said there was an increase in the number of anti-Semitic incidents in the country last year.

In a report released on Wednesday, the Federation of the Jewish Communities said there were 347 anti-Semitic attacks in 2018, up by 221 from 2015 when the last equivalent report was published.

Most of the attacks — 93 percent — appeared on the internet, often on far-right, anti-liberal and pro-Russian media.

The group said there were two physical attacks and three attacks on Jewish property last year. The remainder involved anti-Semitic threats, harassment and verbal abuse.

The report said the Czech Republic remains a safe country for Jews and anti-Semitism is at a relatively low level compared with other European countries.

A new report released this week by the European Union’s Agency for Fundamental Rights found that 81 percent of young Jewish Europeans believed that “racism is a problem in their countries.”

Forty-four percent of those polled said that they had been victims of anti-Semitic harassment, while 85% reported “that people in their countries accuse or blame them for anything done by the Israeli government at least ‘occasionally.’”

Nearly half of respondents said that they did not believe they were receiving adequate protection from their governments and 45% stated that they “choose not to wear, carry or display distinguishable Jewish items in public because they are concerned about their safety.”

read more:
less
comments
more