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Israel to allow vaccinated or recovered tourists to enter starting Nov. 1

Travelers are seen at Ben Gurion Airport near Tel Aviv on September 20, 2021. (Nati Shohat/Flash90)
Travelers are seen at Ben Gurion Airport near Tel Aviv on September 20, 2021. (Nati Shohat/Flash90)

Ministers approve the entry to Israel of tourists who are vaccinated against COVID-19 or recovered from the disease starting November 1. The decision must still be approved by the high-level coronavirus cabinet.

However, only tourists from countries that aren’t defined as “red” due to high infection rates will be allowed in. Additionally, reports say tourists won’t be allowed to travel from countries that are seeing an outbreak of the new AY4.2 variant, which has been causing concern.

Ministers have decided not to recognize Russia’s Sputnik V vaccine, with Prime Minister Naftali Bennett reportedly requesting a few more days to weigh that. It is possible he’ll announce such recognition during his meeting tomorrow in Sochi with Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Only tourists who have been vaccinated during the 180 days before they boarded the plane will be allowed to enter Israel. In the case of the Pfizer vaccine, seven days must have past from the second (or booster) shot until entry to Israel. In the case of Moderna, Astrazeneca, Johnson & Johnson (one dose, not two), Sinovac and Sinopharm, that will be 14 days.

The vast majority of tourists have effectively been banned from entering Israel since the start of the coronavirus pandemic in March of last year. Under current regulations, tourists only began arriving in organized groups in May, though in a very limited capacity. Additionally, first-degree relatives of Israeli citizens or residents were able to apply for permits to travel to the country.

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