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Netanyahu: We will do ‘everything we can’ to stop Iran going nuclear

Barak says Israel facing a ‘fateful decision’ on Iran, as Ahmadinejad boasts of increased enrichment capabilities

In this Feb. 15, 2012 file photo, provided by the Iranian President's Office, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, right, is escorted by technicians during a tour of Tehran's research reactor center in northern Tehran, Iran. (photo credit: AP/Iranian President's Office, File)
In this Feb. 15, 2012 file photo, provided by the Iranian President's Office, Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, right, is escorted by technicians during a tour of Tehran's research reactor center in northern Tehran, Iran. (photo credit: AP/Iranian President's Office, File)

Israel is “committed to doing everything it possibly can in order to stop Iran from going nuclear,” Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said on Wednesday.

His comments were the latest in a series of statements indicating an Israeli readiness to use military action if necessary to thwart Iran’s nuclear drive.

The prime minister was speaking at the Israeli army’s National Security College, and his Defense Minister, Ehud Barak, used the same forum to deliver a similarly firm message.

Israel would have to take “difficult and fateful decisions” in the struggle to prevent Iran from achieving a nuclear weapons capability,” Barak said.

“I am fully aware of the difficulties and complexities involved in preventing Iran from attaining nuclear weapons,” Barak said. “But it is clear to me that having to deal with the challenge” of a nuclear Iran “would be many times more complex, dangerous and costly, both in terms of human life and in terms of resources, than a preemptive strike,” said Barak.

The defense minister asserted that while international sanctions and diplomacy were having an impact they would not be enough to stop Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons. “The United States understands that Israel, and only Israel, is responsible for its fate,” he said.

Israel’s leaders spoke out after Iran’s President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad said in an interview to Iran’s state-run media that Iran has increased the number of active centrifuges enriching uranium for its nuclear program by 1,000, .

“There are currently 11,000 centrifuges active in enrichment facilities,” he was quoted as saying during a meeting with supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and senior regime officials.

The figure is significantly higher than the 10,000 working centrifuges estimated for the Iranian nuclear program in a May International Atomic Energy Agency report, indicating that in the period when Iran was engaged in ultimately fruitless talks with the West over its nuclear program, the Islamic Republic was working to increase its uranium enrichment capability.

And Khamenei, who has the final say on all state matters in Iran, voiced confidence that the Islamic Republic can beat the latest punitive measures aimed at blocking the country’s vital oil and banking industries over the disputed program.

“They (the West) explicitly say they need to increase pressures, tighten sanctions to force Iranian authorities to reconsider their calculations,” Khamenei said in comments broadcast on state television. “But a look at the facts leads us not only to avoid reconsidering our calculations, but to move on our intended path with greater confidence.”

The latest European Union sanctions against Iran’s vital oil industry came into effect on July 1, three days after the US tightened measures that prohibit international banks from completing oil transactions with Iranian banks. The moves, a response to Iran’s refusal to suspend uranium enrichment, further complicate the country’s ability to conduct trade abroad.

Khamenei also urged Iran’s politicians to show unity and avoid bickering in efforts to overcome the sanctions, which experts say have driven up the cost of imports by 20 to 30 percent.

(Associated Press contributed to this report)

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