Chinese ship finds possible MH370 black box signal
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Chinese ship finds possible MH370 black box signal

Vessel detects 'pulse' at a frequency identical to that used by plane flight recorders

A handout photo taken on April 4, 2014, and released on April 5 by Australian Defense shows the towed pinger locator being towed by Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield in the first search for the missing flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean. Two vessels were searching underwater for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 on Saturday, as the clock ticked on the signal from its black box. (photo credit: LSIS Bradley Darvill/Australia Defence/AFP)
A handout photo taken on April 4, 2014, and released on April 5 by Australian Defense shows the towed pinger locator being towed by Australian Defence Vessel Ocean Shield in the first search for the missing flight data recorder and cockpit voice recorder of Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 in the southern Indian Ocean. Two vessels were searching underwater for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 on Saturday, as the clock ticked on the signal from its black box. (photo credit: LSIS Bradley Darvill/Australia Defence/AFP)

BEIJING — A Chinese ship searching for Malaysia Airlines Flight MH370 detected a “pulse signal” in the southern Indian Ocean Saturday, state media said, but it was not yet clear whether it was linked to the missing plane.

The signal had a frequency of 37.5kHz per second — identical to the beacon signal emitted by flight recorders.

A black box detector deployed by the Chinese search ship Haixun 01 picked up the signal at about 25 degrees south latitude and 101 degrees east longitude, the official Xinhua news agency said.

It was yet to be established whether the signal detected by Haixun 01 was related to the missing jet.

Malaysian authorities believe satellite readings indicate MH370 crashed in the Indian Ocean, far off Australia’s western coast, after veering dramatically off course during a flight from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing.

But no proof has yet been found that would indicate a crash site.

Authorities still have no idea how or why the plane vanished, and warn that unless the black box is found, the mystery may never be solved.

Malaysia vowed Saturday that it would not give up on trying to find the missing jetliner and announced details of a multinational investigation team to solve the aviation mystery, as the search for the plane entered its fifth week.

Military and civilian planes, ships with deep-sea searching equipment and a British nuclear submarine scoured a remote patch of the southern Indian Ocean off Australia’s west coast, in an increasingly urgent hunt for debris and the black box recorders that hold vital information about Malaysia Airlines Flight 370’s last hours.

After weeks of fruitless looking, officials face the daunting prospect that sound-emitting beacons in the flight and voice recorders will soon fall silent as their batteries die after sounding electronic “pings” for a month.

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