search

Biden invites Iraqi prime minister to White House

Al-Kadhimi is second Middle Eastern leader slated to visit Washington this month, after Jordan’s King Abdullah; Bennett also expected for talks, but no date set yet

The Prime Minister of the Republic of Iraq, Mustafa Al-Kadhimi arrives to the Vatican for a private audience with Pope Francis, Friday, July 2, 2021. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)
The Prime Minister of the Republic of Iraq, Mustafa Al-Kadhimi arrives to the Vatican for a private audience with Pope Francis, Friday, July 2, 2021. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

WASHINGTON — US President Joe Biden will meet with Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi later this month in Washington, the White House said Friday.

The meeting set for July 26 comes at a pivotal point in the US-Iraq relationship, and amid growing concerns about more frequent attacks against American troops in Iraq and Syria.

Al-Kadhimi is the second Middle Eastern leader invited to the White House this month. Jordan’s King Abdullah II will visit on July 19. The White House has also announced that Prime Minister Naftali Bennett had been invited to meet Biden for the first time, but a date for that visit has yet to be set.

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said Biden “also looks forward to strengthening bilateral cooperation with Iraq on political, economic and security issues to include joint efforts to ensure the enduring defeat” of the Islamic State terror group.

There have been at least eight drone attacks targeting the US presence since Biden took office in January, as well as 17 rocket attacks.

The attacks on US forces have been blamed on the Iranian-backed militias that make up the bulk of Iraq’s state-supported Popular Mobilization Forces.

US President Joe Biden tries to hear questions shouted by reporters as he heads to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, July 16, 2021, to spend the weekend at Camp David. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The Biden administration has responded by twice targeting Iraqi militia groups operating inside Syria, including one close to the Iraq border.

The relationship has been complicated since last year’s US drone strike killing of Iran’s expeditionary Quds Force commander Qassem Soleimani and senior Iraqi militia commander Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis at Baghdad International Airport. That strike was ordered by then-president Donald Trump.

But with the Biden administration seeking to revive an Obama-era nuclear accord with Iran, there have been signs that Iran is looking to curb, at least for now, militia attacks on the US.

Soleimani’s successor Esmail Ghaani last month called on Iranian-backed militias to remain calm until after nuclear talks between Iran and the United States, The Associated Press reported last week.

read more:
comments
Never miss breaking news on Israel
Get notifications to stay updated
You're subscribed