ISRAEL AT WAR - DAY 148

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Viewing history

Cinematheque opens archive to global viewers for Israel’s 75th

For about a month, even non-Israelis can stream 75 classic films from the collection that are usually blocked outside of Israel, with both English and Hebrew subtitles

Jessica Steinberg, The Times of Israel's culture and lifestyles editor, covers the Sabra scene from south to north and back to the center

Chaim Topol (left) in Efraim Kishon's 1964 film, 'Sallah Shabati,' now available to screen for a nominal fee from the Jerusalem Cinematheque Archives, through May 2023 (Courtesy United King Films)
Chaim Topol (left) in Efraim Kishon's 1964 film, 'Sallah Shabati,' now available to screen for a nominal fee from the Jerusalem Cinematheque Archives, through May 2023 (Courtesy United King Films)

Jerusalem Cinematheque’s Israeli Film Archive is marking the country’s 75th Independence Day by streaming 75 classic Israeli films.

The films are available to watch on the Israeli Film Archive’s website through May 17, for the token price of NIS 15 (around $4.10) per film. Some 20 percent of the films are offered free of charge as well.

The majority of the Cinematheque Film Archives is usually geographically blocked and only available for streaming in Israel due to the copyright holders’ international distribution contracts and agreements.

The Film Archive secured all necessary permissions from both copyright and distribution rights holders on the occasion of Israel’s Independence Day.

The films have both Hebrew and English subtitles available.

They span the years of Israeli filmmaking, including award-winning movies such as Ephraim Kishon’s “Sallah Shabati” (1964), Avi Nesher’s “The Band” (1978), and Shmuel Hasfari’s “Sh’Chur” (1994).

There are also some hidden gems, such as Raphael Nussbaum’s 1960 film “Burning Sands,” and a number of films professionally restored by the archive with the guidance of either the director or cinematographer, including Rafi Bukai’s 1986 film “Avanti Popolo,” “Atash” (Thirst) from Tawfik Abu Wael (2004), and Uri Zohar’s 1974 “Big Eyes.”

Uri Zohar (left) and Arik Einstein in Zohar’s film ‘Big Eyes,’ now available to screen for a nominal fee from the Jerusalem Cinematheque Archives, through May 2023 (Courtesy United King Films)

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