Hezbollah supporters break up Beirut protest camp, burning and dismantling tents
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Hezbollah supporters break up Beirut protest camp, burning and dismantling tents

Violence comes shortly after dozens of other backers of terror group attack anti-government demonstrators’ roadblock

Hezbollah supporters, foreground, fight with an anti-government protester during clashes erupted between them during ongoing protests against the Lebanese government in Beirut, Lebanon, October 29, 2019 (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)
Hezbollah supporters, foreground, fight with an anti-government protester during clashes erupted between them during ongoing protests against the Lebanese government in Beirut, Lebanon, October 29, 2019 (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

Hundreds of Lebanese supporters of the Hezbollah terror group, some wielding sticks, attacked a protest camp set up by anti-government demonstrators in central Beirut, burning some of its tents and dismantling others Tuesday.

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri was due to speak Tuesday as rumors swirled of his imminent resignation following nearly two weeks of unprecedented protests demanding political change.

Hariri’s office summoned the press as counterdemonstrators wielding sticks and throwing stones attacked the main protest site in Beirut.

The violence came shortly after dozens of other Hezbollah supporters, also wielding sticks, attacked a roadblock set up by the protesters on a main thoroughfare in the capital.

Tuesday marked the 13th day of Lebanon’s anti-government protests, which have been an unprecedented expression of anger that’s united millions of Lebanese against what demonstrators say is a corrupt and inefficient political class in power for decades since the 1975-1990 civil war.

But in recent days, Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah grew critical of the protests, claiming they have been backed and financed by foreign powers and rival political groups.

Hezbollah supporters,left, burn tents in the protest camp set up by anti-government protesters near the government palace, in Beirut, Lebanon, Oct. 29, 2019 (AP Photo/Hussein Malla)

“What does it mean that the Israelis get Lebanese among those who are in the Zionist entity to the border to show solidarity with the protests,” he was quoted saying by Hezbollah’s Al-Manar television network on Friday. It was not immediately clear what he was referring to.

He called on his supporters to leave the rallies, and urged the protesters to remove the roadblocks. The mass rallies have paralyzed a country already grappling with a severe fiscal crisis.

Hezbollah and its allies dominate the current government and is the country’s most powerful organization.

The riot police and military first moved in Tuesday trying to separate the rival groups, but the security forces failed to stop the storming of Martyrs Square, where anti-government protesters have held their ground since October 17.

The protesters are calling on the government to step down, holding rallies in public squares and promoting a civil disobedience campaign that include blocking main roads.

At the Beirut roadblock, the angry crowd swelled by early afternoon, some using sticks to chase protesters away. Some of the men also attacked journalists, kicking them and attempting to smash their cameras.

Many among the angry mob chanted: “God, Nasrallah, and the whole Dahiyeh,” in reference to the southern suburb that is a stronghold of the Iranian-backed terror group that seeks to destroy Israel. Others told TV crews that they were upset at the roadblocks and insults to their leader.

Lebanese security forces intervene to separate between demonstrators counter-protesters in the capital Beirut’s downtown district as the latter set fire to a tent during the 13th day of anti-government protests on October 29, 2019. (ANWAR AMRO / AFP)

Then they marched to the central square, tearing down tents, smashing plastic chairs and using metal poles to poke holes in the tents, which they later burned. They also beat some anti-government protesters. One TV presenter described it as “a war scene.”

In his speech on Friday, Nasrallah evoked the specter of new civil war like the one that ended in 1990, saying “someone is trying to pull it … toward a civil war.”

It was seen a precursor to the confrontation Tuesday.

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