Jewish extremist group Lehava said planning to disrupt LGBTQ rally in Jerusalem
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'Wear extreme colors - pink, green, purple, gold' guide says

Jewish extremist group Lehava said planning to disrupt LGBTQ rally in Jerusalem

Anti-coexistence organization publishes guide instructing members on how to infiltrate Sunday’s event, with advice on ‘dress code,’ slang and ‘behavioral patterns’

Members of the right-wing organization Lehava protest outside the Barbur Gallery in Jerusalem, on February 08, 2017. (Lior Mizrahi/Flash90)
Members of the right-wing organization Lehava protest outside the Barbur Gallery in Jerusalem, on February 08, 2017. (Lior Mizrahi/Flash90)

The Jewish extremist group Lehava reportedly intends to infiltrate and disrupt a pro-LGBTQ event in Jerusalem on Sunday, and has published instructions for its members on how to “not stand out” while slipping into the rally.

The capital’s annual Pride Parade was scrapped this year due to the coronavirus outbreak, and in its place a rally will be held at its LGBTQ community center, the Jerusalem Open House.

Lehava directed its supporters to attend the event, and disrupt it from within, according to a Thursday report from Channel 12 news. Group leaders in a briefing called for the extremist activists to mingle with the crowd, then raise their own signs and disrupt the proceedings.

The group published a guide for its members with a “dress code” and other instructions on how to infiltrate the Pride event, said the report, which included what it said was a copy of the pamphlet.

The guide includes the categories for clothing, “behavioral patterns” and “LGBTQ language.”

In the behavior section, the guide advises “extroverted body movements, such as ‘talking with the hands.’”

“Pay attention! They tend to express themselves with long handshakes or hugs, be careful and stay away,” it says, adding that infiltrators should speak loudly to better blend in.

The guide advises the Lehava activists to dress in colorful clothing “in order to not stand out,” and includes a guide to “homosexual slang,” the report said.

Lehava protesters hold signs reading ‘Assimilation is a Holocaust’ outside a Jewish-Muslim wedding near Tel Aviv, August 17, 2014. (Flash90)

The clothing instructions advise the infiltrators to wear shorts and printed T-shirts. If attendees wear kippahs, or religious head coverings, it says to wear either a small kippah, or “colorful, strange, ridiculous hats (like hats for Purim costumes.”

It also advises “a combination of extreme colors in shorts and pants, such as pink, green, purple, gold.”

For legal issues it says members can contact the far-right lawyer, and head from the extremist Otzma Yehudit political party, Itamar Ben Gvir.

The guide tells group members to not allow authorities to search their person, which it says is against the law, and tells them they do not need to answer any police questions.

Lehava opposes intermarriage and the assimilation of Jews and tries to stifle any public activity by non-Jews in Israel. Lehava, which some lawmakers have tried to designate a terrorist group, has frequently called for action to be taken against non-Jews in order to “save the daughters of Israel.”

People take part in the annual Gay Pride Parade in Jerusalem on June 6, 2019. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

This year’s annual pride parades in Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa and Beersheba were all canceled due to the pandemic. Numerous virtual events will instead be taking place this year, organizers said in May.

Last year, the Tel Aviv parade drew some 250,000 people.

While much smaller than Tel Aviv’s event, the Jerusalem parade is a highlight for the city’s vibrant LGBTQ community, which is beset by religious and political tensions ever-present in the capital.

Some 10,000-15,000 people marched in Jerusalem’s 2019 pride parade, with over 2,000 police securing the highly charged event four years after 16-year-old Shira Banki was stabbed to death in a deadly attack on participants by a Jewish extremist.

The Jerusalem Municipality sparked an uproar on Tuesday by removing an LGBTQ pride banner from an external wall of a US embassy facility in the capital. The city’s far-right deputy mayor said the embassy had failed to request permission to hang the sign, which expressed support for “tolerance and diversity.”

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