ISRAEL AT WAR - DAY 149

search

9 Israeli children have been held hostage in Gaza for 54 days

Israelis hold photographs of the Bibas family, and orange balloons to represent the redheaded children, at a press conference calling for the release of 10-month-old Kfir, 4-year-old Ariel, and their parents Shiri and Yarden Bibas, at 'Hostage Square' in Tel Aviv, November 28, 2023 (Miriam Alster/Flash90)
Israelis hold photographs of the Bibas family, and orange balloons to represent the redheaded children, at a press conference calling for the release of 10-month-old Kfir, 4-year-old Ariel, and their parents Shiri and Yarden Bibas, at 'Hostage Square' in Tel Aviv, November 28, 2023 (Miriam Alster/Flash90)

Thirty-one children held by Gazan terrorists have been released as part of a temporary ceasefire deal with Hamas, but after 54 days, 9 still remain in the Strip.

These are the children who have been held hostage by the terror group since October 7:

Kfir Bibas, 10 months, and Ariel Bibas, 4

Kfir, the youngest hostage in Gaza, was kidnapped from Kibbutz Nir Oz along with his brother Ariel and parents, Yarden and Shiri.

Due to Kfir’s extraordinarily young age, the redheaded children have become some of the most recognizable among the hostages.

The family was kidnapped by Hamas, but at some point was transferred to another Palestinian terror group in Gaza, the military said Monday.

On the day of their capture, a video circulated of Shiri holding her children in her arms, a look of terror on her face as she was surrounded by terrorists, her boys facing her chest, a blanket covering them.

There was also a video of Yarden, injured with blood on his head, surrounded by terrorists.

Gali Tarshansky, 13

Gali was kidnapped from Kibbutz Be’eri after her brother, Lior, 15, was killed.

The two were hiding in their safe room, along with their father Ilya, when terrorists broke into their home.

Gali and Ilya jumped out of the window and survived. The father was not taken captive and Lior’s body was identified later.

The two siblings were an inseparable pair, said family members in a video.

Amit Shani, 16

Amit was the only member of his family taken by Hamas terrorists on October 7 during the massacre in Kibbutz Be’eri.

He was kidnapped in front of his mother Tal, 47.

Amit and his neighbor, Yossi Sharabi, and Sharabi’s daughter’s visiting boyfriend, Ofir Engel, were all ordered into a black car.

Ofir Engel, 18

Ofir, kidnapped from Kibbutz Be’eri on October 7, had his birthday in Gaza.

Engel, a dual Dutch-Israeli citizen from Kibbutz Ramat Rachel adjacent to Jerusalem, was visiting his girlfriend.

Ofir was last in contact at around 12:30 p.m. when he told his family that he was hiding with the Sharabi family in their sealed room.

Hamas gunmen broke into the family’s sealed room and took everyone out, then they told the women to sit on the grass and shot the family dog.

Bilal Ziyadne, 18, and Aisha Ziyadne, 17

Bilal and Aisha were kidnapped while working in the cowshed at Kibbutz Holit, along with their father Youssef, 53, and older brother Hamza, 23.

The family lives in the Bedouin city of Rahat, in the Ziyadne neighborhood, named for their extensive family clan.

Wahid Ahoziil, a volunteer for the Center for the Missing and Captives in the Arab community, described the family as “simple people” who have worked for many years at local kibbutzim.

Liam Or, 18

Liam was captured along with his uncle Dror, 48, and his cousins, Noam, 17, and Alma, 13 from Kibbutz Be’eri.

Noam and Alma were released as part of the temporary truce on November 25.

Itay Regev, 18

Itay and his sister Maya, 21, were kidnapped from the Supernova music festival, a day after returning to Israel from abroad, where they had celebrated their mother’s birthday.

Maya was released on November 25 as part of the truce deal. She was shot on October 7, and she remains hospitalized after undergoing surgery.

Never miss breaking news on Israel
Get notifications to stay updated
You're subscribed
image
Register for free
and continue reading
Registering also lets you comment on articles and helps us improve your experience. It takes just a few seconds.
Already registered? Enter your email to sign in.
Please use the following structure: example@domain.com
Or Continue with
By registering you agree to the terms and conditions. Once registered, you’ll receive our Daily Edition email for free.
Register to continue
Or Continue with
Log in to continue
Sign in or Register
Or Continue with
check your email
Check your email
We sent an email to you at .
It has a link that will sign you in.