Paul McCartney says he ‘saw God’ during psychedelic drug trip
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Paul McCartney says he ‘saw God’ during psychedelic drug trip

Former Beatle was ‘humbled’ by vision while on Dimethyltryptamine, though it ‘didn’t turn my life around’

In this September 11, 2017, photo, singer/songwriter Paul McCartney performs on stage at the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey. (Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP)
In this September 11, 2017, photo, singer/songwriter Paul McCartney performs on stage at the Prudential Center in Newark, New Jersey. (Brent N. Clarke/Invision/AP)

Paul McCartney told a British newspaper he believes he once saw God during a psychedelic trip.

The 76-year-old former Beatle told The Sunday Times he was “humbled” by the experience.

He said, “We were immediately nailed to the sofa. And I saw God, this amazing towering thing, and I was humbled.”

McCartney acknowledged taking the psychedelic drug Dimethyltryptamine (DMT), though he did not specify when the incident occurred.

Despite “seeing God,” he said it didn’t change his life immediately.

“And what I’m saying is, that moment didn’t turn my life around, but it was a clue,” he told the paper.

“It was huge. A massive wall that I couldn’t see the top of, and I was at the bottom. And anybody else would say it’s just the drug, the hallucination, but both [art dealer] Robert [Fraser] and I were, like, ‘Did you see that?’ We felt we had seen a higher thing,” he said.

The Beatles’ music was heavily influenced by psychedelic drugs in the band’s final years.

McCartney also spoke in the interview of allowing himself to believe that his lost loved ones, including his late wife Linda (Eastman, who was Jewish), are “looking down” on him.

Relating to current affairs, McCartney lamented that “violence and arrogance are back… It’s like how fashion goes in cycles, how bell-bottoms came back. We were heading towards sense, but we are into the next pendulum swing now,” he said.

The singer recently released two tracks from his new album “Egypt Station.” The album is due out on September 7, and will be accompanied by a world tour. His scheduled tour does not include Israel, where he played in 2007.

He remains one of music’s most popular concert acts.

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