Tires slashed on 30 cars in Arab town, truck sprayed with ‘Jews won’t be silent’
search

Tires slashed on 30 cars in Arab town, truck sprayed with ‘Jews won’t be silent’

Attack in Kafr Kassem comes days after property of residents of Jab’a, near Bethlehem, was daubed with Stars of David, slogans proclaiming ‘revenge’

A truck spray-painted with the words 'Jews won't be silent' in the Arab Israeli town of Kafr Kassem, December 2, 2018 (Israel Police)
A truck spray-painted with the words 'Jews won't be silent' in the Arab Israeli town of Kafr Kassem, December 2, 2018 (Israel Police)

Police opened an investigation Sunday after the tires of some 30 vehicles were slashed in the central Israeli Arab town of Kafr Kassem, in an apparent hate crime.

One truck was spray-painted with the slogan, “Jews will not be silent.”

On Friday police said they were investigating the similar vandalism of a building and vehicles in a Palestinian village near Bethlehem.

Residents of the West Bank village of Jab’a, southwest of Bethlehem, said they discovered graffiti spray-painted on homes and cars in the morning, and the tires of nine vehicles had been punctured. The graffiti included Stars of David and the words “Bat Ayin evacuation — revenge.” The previous day, police had demolished an illegally constructed toilet facility near a synagogue in the nearby settlement of Bat Ayin.

A car in the West Bank village of Jab’a spray-painted with the words ‘Bat Ayin evacuation – revenge’ in an apparent hate crime, November 30, 2018 (Courtesy)

Extremist settlers have often engaged in attacks on Palestinians — often vandalism but sometimes physical violence — as ostensible retaliation for terror attacks or Israeli government actions deemed hostile to the settler movement.

Such attacks have increased in frequency in recent months.

Last Sunday, a number of vehicles were damaged and graffiti was spray-painted on walls and cars in the Palestinian village of al-Mughayir in the central West Bank.

Tires of vehicles were slashed, and slogans such as “Revenge,” “Price tag” and “Enough with administrative orders” were found sprayed on walls and cars.

A home in the West Bank village of Jab’a spray-painted with the words ‘Bat Ayin – revenge’ in an apparent hate crime, November 30, 2018 (Courtesy)

Administrative orders, when used to prevent settler violence, can include detention without formal charges, bans from entering the entire West Bank, and bans on contacting certain individuals, as well as nightly curfews.

Many so-called “hilltop youth” settlers have railed at the use of administrative orders against activists suspected of committing attacks against Palestinians in the West Bank and non-Jews in Israel.

Administrative detention is also widely used against Palestinians, and has been criticized by many rights groups as it allows Israel to hold detainees for long periods of time without trial, access to a lawyer or even knowing what they are accused of.

Last month, Aisha Rabi, a Palestinian mother of eight, was killed when a rock the size of a large tissue box flew through the windshield of the car her husband was driving and struck her head.

A car belonging to a Palestinian couple is seen after it was involved in a deadly crash reportedly due to stone-throwing by Israeli settlers at the Tapuah Junction in the northern West Bank on October 12, 2018. (Zachariah Sadeh/Rabbis for Human Rights); Aisha Muhammad Talal Rabi (Courtesy)

Her husband has asserted that the stone was thrown by Israeli settlers, as he heard Hebrew being spoken. The Shin Bet and Israel Police have both opened probes into the incident, which remain under gag order.

The Times of Israel learned earlier this month that the growing conviction among defense officials was that the 47-year-old Rabi was killed in a terror attack perpetrated by Israelis.

Jacob Magid contributed to this report.

read more:
comments
more less