Trump steps up attacks on ‘disgusting’ media, prompts crowd to jeer at reporters
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Pointing to journalists in hall: 'They only make up stories'

Trump steps up attacks on ‘disgusting’ media, prompts crowd to jeer at reporters

President's Inflammatory performance at Pennsylvania rally comes after White House refuses to distance itself from his claim that media is 'enemy' of American people.

President Donald J. Trump singles out the media during his rally on August 2, 2018 at the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania. (Rick Loomis/Getty Images/AFP)
President Donald J. Trump singles out the media during his rally on August 2, 2018 at the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania. (Rick Loomis/Getty Images/AFP)

WILKES-BARRE, Pa. (AP) — President Donald Trump ratcheted up his campaign against the media, claiming at a Pennsylvania rally that the media is the “fake, fake disgusting news” and casting journalists as his true political opponent.

Trump barnstormed Thursday night in a state that he swiped from the Democrats in 2016 and that is home to a Senate seat he is trying to place in the Republicans’ column this fall. But the race between GOP U.S. Rep. Lou Barletta and two-term incumbent Democratic Sen. Bob Casey took a back seat to Trump’s invectives against the media, which came amid a backdrop of antagonism to journalists from the White House and hostility from the thousands packed into a loud, overheated Wilkes-Barre arena.

“Whatever happened to the free press? Whatever happened to honest reporting?” Trump asked, pointing to the media in the back of the hall. “They don’t report it. They only make up stories.”

Time and time again, Trump denounced the press for underselling his accomplishments and doubting his political rise.

Supporters cheer for President Donald J. Trump as he speaks to a large crowd on August 2, 2018 at the Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania. (Rick Loomis/Getty Images/AFP)

He tore into the media for diminishing what he accomplished at his Singapore summit with North Korea leader Kim Jong Un. He tore into the tough questioning he received in Helsinki when he met with Russia’s Vladimir Putin last month. And he began the speech with a 10-minute remembrance of his 2016 election night victory, bemoaning that Pennsylvania wasn’t the state to clinch the White House for him only because “the fake news refused to call it.”

“They were suffering that night, they were suffering,” Trump said of the election night pundits. He then promised that the Keystone State would deliver his margin of victory “next time.”

“Only negative stories from the fakers back there,” the president declared.

With each denunciation, the crowd jeered and screamed at the press in the holding pen at the back of the arena.

President Donald Trump arrives at a rally, Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, at Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes Barre, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The inflammatory performance came just hours after White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders refused to distance herself from Trump’s previous assertions that the media is the “enemy” of the American people. Pressed during a White House briefing on the issue, Sanders said Trump “has made his position known.”

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

In a heated exchange with reporters, she recited a litany of complaints against the press and blamed the media for inflaming tensions in the country.

“As far as I know, I’m the first press secretary in the history of the United States that’s required Secret Service protection,” she said, accusing the media of continuing “to ratchet up the verbal assault against the president and everyone in this administration.”

Though Barletta’s bid was an undercard to the Trump’s main event, savaging his opponents, the president did bless the congressman’s bid. Trump, who has accelerated his campaign schedule in recent weeks to help the Republicans he favors both in primaries and November’s midterms, was the first Republican to win Pennsylvania since 1988.

“For years and years, they said Republicans should win the state of Pennsylvania,” Trump said. “It always got away. But we won the state of Pennsylvania.”

Republican Senate candidate Rep. Lou Barletta, R-Pa., speaks as President Donald Trump listens during a rally, Thursday, Aug. 2, 2018, at Mohegan Sun Arena at Casey Plaza in Wilkes Barre, Pa.. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

He and Barletta, who is trailing by double digits in the polls, share hard-line immigration views, and Trump lashed Casey with his own derogatory nickname: “Sleeping Bob.”

But Trump’s focus was defending his own accomplishments and beliefs. He pushed for tougher borders, overstating the threat posed by violent gangs like MS-13 and making the murderous group a stand-in for all immigrants in the United States illegally.

He defended his kid-glove approach to both Kim and Putin, saying, “it would be a good thing, not a bad thing” to have warmer relations with the hostile powers and dismissing the talk that meeting with the autocrats elevated them on the world stage.

He bashed the Democratic leadership of Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi and, curiously, suggested that his frequent foe Rep. Maxine Waters of California was “a new star” of the party.

He raved about the booming economy and said, without evidence, that his blue-collar supporters in states like Pennsylvania were the biggest beneficiaries.

And he looked ahead to his 2020 re-election campaign, touting his new slogan, “Keep America Great Again” while musing whether he wanted Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, whom he decried as “Pocahontas,” or Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, whom he flatly deemed “crazy,” as his opponent.

The rally came at a perilous time for Trump, who the day before bluntly declared his attorney general should terminate “right now” the federal probe into the campaign that took him to the White House, a newly fervent attack on the special counsel investigation that could imperil his presidency.

Sanders scrambled to explain that Trump’s tweet was “not an order” and the president was not directing his attorney general to do anything.

“It’s the president’s opinion,” she said.

But Trump’s tweetstorm again raised the specter that he could try to more directly bring special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia-Trump election-collusion probe to a premature end. And it revived the idea that the president’s tweets themselves might be used as evidence that he is attempting to obstruct justice.

Negotiations have also started again about a possible presidential interview as Mueller’s team has offered the White House format changes, perhaps willing to limit some questions asked of Trump or accept some answers in writing, according to a person briefed on the proposal who wasn’t authorized to discuss private talks and spoke on condition of anonymity.

Ivanka keeps her distance

Earlier Thursday, Ivanka Trump had distanced herself from some of her father’s most controversial policies and strident rhetoric, saying she was “vehemently against” family separations and that journalists are not the enemy.

Speaking publicly for the first time since she shuttered her eponymous fashion brand last week, the president’s daughter and senior adviser said she had “sensitivity” about why some people who feel targeted have gripes with reporters, but that the name which the president has bestowed on them was misplaced.

“No, I do not feel that the media is the enemy of the people,” Ivanka said at a conference organized by news website Axios.

Ivanka Trump participates in a conversation on workforce development and news of the day at the Newseum in Washington on August 2, 2018. (AFP/ Jim WATSON)

Before the rally, Trump took to Twitter in an attempt to qualify his daughter’s statement on the media.

Ivanka also took a decidedly different approach than her combative father on immigration, stressing that the separation of families at the border has caused her anxiety.

“That was a low point for me as well,” said Trump, referring to the Trump administration’s “zero tolerance” policy that led to the stripping of thousands of children from their migrant parents.

“I am very vehemently against family separation and the separation of parents and children, so I would agree with that sentiment.”

A boy from Honduras is shown being taken into custody by US Border Patrol agents near the US-Mexico Border near Mission, Texas, on June 12, 2018. (John Moore/Getty Images via JTA)

Ivanka’s position aligns with the opinion of everyday Americans, who polls show are largely opposed to the separations.

The immigration crisis, which swelled further when audio emerged of detained toddlers crying for their mothers, caused a firestorm and in June the president reversed course.

But as of last week’s deadline, 711 of the roughly 2,500 separated children were still not reunited with their parents, and officials were unable to clarify when they would see their family.

‘Incredibly difficult issues’

Many observers at the start of Trump’s presidency expressed confidence that Ivanka and her husband, Jared Kushner, formed a compassionate camp in the White House and would act as a check on her father’s cruder instincts.

That has largely failed to materialize. While Trump was said to have discouraged her father privately from the border policy, she said nothing publicly until after his reversal, when she thanked him for “taking critical action ending family separation.”

Last year, she urged him to keep the United States in the Paris climate accord, but her prodding fell on deaf ears and the president pulled out.

Ivanka Trump, center, and White House senior adviser Jared Kushner, right, listen to US President Donald Trump during a cabinet meeting at the White House, in Washington, November 20, 2017. (Evan Vucci/AP)

In November, as Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore faced accusations of misconduct with teen girls when he was in his 30s, Ivanka Trump declared “there’s a special place in hell for people who prey on children.”

But two weeks later, the president endorsed Moore, who ultimately lost to a Democrat.

As first daughter, Ivanka, 36, has traveled overseas representing the United States, attended meetings with visiting heads of state and traveled domestically, fueling speculation she may harbor future political ambitions of her own.

“I’m really passionate about the work that I’m doing here and I’m really committed to it,” she said Thursday.

So much so that last week she announced she was closing her fashion brand, following criticism about potential conflicts of interest and flagging sales.

In discussing the immigration crisis, Ivanka described herself as “the daughter of an immigrant” — her mother was born and raised in the former Czechoslovakia, and came to the US legally.

“So we have to be very careful about incentivizing behavior that puts children at risk of being trafficked,” said Trump, a mother of three.

“These are incredibly difficult issues, and like the rest of the country I experience them in a very emotional way.”

AFP contributed to this report.

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