Israel’s ambassador to the United Nations, Ron Prosor, on Monday warned the UN Security Council that Hezbollah was close to getting its hands on Syria’s massive stockpile of chemical weapons.

“In Lebanon, Hezbollah is building an army equipped with 50,000 missiles — more than many NATO members. Now they might have access to one of the largest stockpiles of chemical weapons in the world,” said Prosor, a day after the IDF’s top intelligence analyst said that President Bashar Assad was in possession of more than 1,000 metric tons of chemical weapons and had deployed sarin nerve gas against civilians.

Prosor blamed the European Union for ignoring Hezbollah’s terrorist actions and stubbornly refusing to brand the group a terror organization.

“Hezbollah doesn’t feel the need to limit its brand of terrorism exclusively to the Middle East,” he said. “Last month, a court in Cyprus jailed a member of Hezbollah for planning terrorist attacks against civilians. Yet this still isn’t enough for some EU members to call Hezbollah what it is – a terrorist organization. It operates with impunity on European soil, yet some European lawmakers continue to insist it is a social-services organization.

“It doesn’t take a Sherlock Holmes to understand the obvious facts of this case,” Prosor added.

The Security Council was deliberating new ways to advance the peace process between Israel and the Palestinians, and Prosor listed “three pillars” of any future agreement, echoing demands often set out by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.

Those pillars — Palestinian recognition of Israel’s Jewish character, a cessation of anti-Israel incitement in the PA, and security assurances for Israelis — “are the foundation that must remain standing in the shifting sands of the Middle East,” he said.

When it came to the international community’s ongoing effort to engage Iran in order to curb its nuclear program, Prosor warned that Tehran was playing for time to keep the West at bay while it scrambles to reach atomic weapons capability.

“The Iranian regime spins lies almost as quickly as they are spinning centrifuges,” he said. “The Iranian nuclear program continues to advance at the speed of an express train. The international community’s efforts to stop them are moving at the pace of the local train, pausing at every stop for some nations to get off and on.”