Accessorize the fall wardrobe
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Accessorize the fall wardrobe

Well-known, and soon to be well-known designers present their clothes and accessories for the season

Jessica Steinberg covers the Sabra scene from south to north and back to the center.

A necklace of washers, by Yaniv Baranes (photo credit: Sherban Lupu)
A necklace of washers, by Yaniv Baranes (photo credit: Sherban Lupu)

With the holidays over and the cold weather getting a tad closer — finally — it’s time to sharpen up the fall wardrobe. Sandals and sleeveless options are heading to the back of the closet, while sweaters, sleeves and closed shoes are re-entering the wardrobe, and, yes, it’s time.

Yet while we’re beginning to feel that chill in the air, it’s not as if winter is fast approaching. That takes some time, even into November, and in certain parts of the country, a winter coat is never actually necessary, except, perhaps, on the rainiest of days.

That’s why many local designers only design two collections each year, one for the long summer, and another for the fall/winter season.

“We don’t need more than that,” shrugged Kedem Sasson, during a recent morning in his Tel Aviv studio. “Israeli-designed clothes work for most of the year.”

Still, you need to gussy up last year’s standards with some fresh pieces and accessories. Check out our picks below for what to look for this season.

At a Kedem Sasson photo shoot (Courtesy Kedem Sasson)
At a Kedem Sasson photo shoot (Courtesy Kedem Sasson)

1. Think about a piece from Kedem Sasson, king of conceptual clothing, designed in blowsy, full lines, made for all sorts of sizes, from tall and slim to those of average height and perhaps slightly less slim than they used to be. Having just returned from a summer trip to Kenya, where he styled, designed and photo shot his work in African environs, Sasson’s fall collection is full of his usual monochrome grays and blacks, but brightened by azure blue or tweed jackets. What’s more, many of the pieces can be worn in different ways, first buttoned as a dress, then opened for a jacket, and, for the most part, as said, can be worn any time of year. “My clothes are for endless seasons,” said Sasson, during a recent fitting. “I’m all about fitting women.”

Kedem Sasson, with stores around the country.

2.  Don’t feel like investing in clothing? Understandable. It can get pricey. Think about updating last year’s pieces with jewelry. Yaniv Baranes hasn’t even started selling his one-of-a-kind necklaces and bracelets in stores, but the hardware-conceived pieces are sure to thrill buyers. Baranes started playing with his father’s hardware store washers and bolts back when he was still a kid, and his dad had hopes that he’d end up running the store. But the Shenkar-trained graduate went in a different direction, first making a curtain for his one-bedroom apartment out of washers, and then experimented with dipping the metal pieces in electrostatic tubs of black paint. Now he’s stringing them together — painstakingly — in modern breastplate necklaces and chunky bracelets. “I didn’t think I’d do this,” said Baranes, who markets his handmade jewelry via Instagram. “But I love figuring it out.”

Washers, nuts and bolts, by Yaniv Baranes (photo credit: Sherban Lupu)
Washers, nuts and bolts, by Yaniv Baranes (photo credit: Sherban Lupu)

YanivBaranes on Instagram, and on Facebook, ranging in price from NIS 200 to NIS 800.

3. For another accessory addition, try Guy Gil on Sheinkin in Tel Aviv. The former Jerusalem-bred hairdresser was biding time in the clothing store he owned in Tel Aviv when he started playing around with beads and plastic pieces, eventually hitting upon his intensely colorful combinations of necklaces, earrings and bracelets that he now sells in his Sheinkin store. He sculpts the plastic pieces himself, laser cutting sheets of bright plastic into various shapes that are then strung with the beads Gil collects and buys. “I want each piece to stand out,” said Gil, “and mine are one-offs. When you wear one, you know no one else is going to be wearing the exact same thing.”

Just one of Guy Gil's supremely colorful, playful necklaces (Courtesy Guy Gil)
Just one of Guy Gil’s supremely colorful, playful necklaces (Courtesy Guy Gil)

The Wonderful World of Guy Gil (HaOlam HaMufla shel Guy Gil), 34 Sheinkin, and also available via Facebook, Marmelada Market, ranging in price from NIS 149 to NIS 420.

Swimwuit fabric stretched over elasticized innards, creating a scarflike necklace (Courtesy Einat Burg/FROG)
Swimwuit fabric stretched over elasticized innards, creating a scarflike necklace (Courtesy Einat Burg/FROG)

4. How about a scarf made of swimsuit fabric? Einat Burg was working in stage costumes when she found herself playing around with scraps of fabric, fashioning light-as-a-feather necklaces and scarves. The 33-year-old Tel Aviv designer, a graduate of the Kibbutzim College, founded the label FROG, specializing in her unique method of processing textiles. She uses layers upon layers to compliment different bodies and figures, winding and wrapping the geometrical and versatile designs. “My creations can change their look and mood according to the way they’re worn,” said Burg. “Every item is versatile, and can upgrade any outfit.”

FROG collections are sold in selected boutiques around Israel and via her website.

5. It’s just about time to throw a little something on in the cool evening air, like a bamboo sweater or soy shawl. Try Toosha, from mother-and-daughter pair Tom and Tzameret Moatty, who started playing with bamboo threads while Tom was still studying at Shenkar, and realized they were onto something. They now import bamboo, soy and cotton thread from abroad, and then dye and weave their featherlight scarves and sweaters in a palate of muted, quiet hues in their Jaffa studio. What’s wonderful about the sweaters is that they’re cool to wear when it’s hot out, and warm when it’s cool out.

Available on Etsy, the Toosha website and at the Jaffa studio, (and worn by Kedem Sasson models on the runway), prices from NIS 285 to NIS 385 for scarves, NIS 400 to NIS 1200 for sweaters.

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