Two Palestinian women in court over Israeli soldier slap video
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Two Palestinian women in court over Israeli soldier slap video

Nariman Tamimi, 43, and Nour Naji Tamimi, 21, remanded for alleged assault intended to provoke troops

Nariman Tamimi holds a Palestinian flag during clashes with Israeli security forces following a march against land confiscation on April 15, 2016, in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh near Ramallah.  (AFP PHOTO / ABBAS MOMANI)
Nariman Tamimi holds a Palestinian flag during clashes with Israeli security forces following a march against land confiscation on April 15, 2016, in the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh near Ramallah. (AFP PHOTO / ABBAS MOMANI)

Two more Palestinian women appeared in an Israeli military court Thursday after a viral video showed an alleged assault on Israeli soldiers in the West Bank, with the court ordering them held until next Monday.

Nariman Tamimi, 43, and Nour Naji Tamimi, 21, were detained in a case that has set Israeli and Palestinian social media alight.

The video filmed in the village of Nabi Saleh in the West Bank shows Nour and her cousin Ahed Tamimi, 16, approaching two Israeli soldiers, before shoving, kicking and slapping them while filming on mobile phones.

The heavily armed soldiers do not respond in the face of what appears to be an attempt to provoke them.

They then move backwards after Ahed’s mother Nariman becomes involved.

A second video shows the two cousins telling the soldiers, apparently standing on the stairs of the family home, to leave.

Ahed, the primary instigator in the videos, appeared before a court on Wednesday and her detention was extended until December 25.

Ahed Tamimi at the Ofer Military Court on December 20, 2017. (Hadas Parush/Flash90)

She is accused of “assaulting a soldier, harming the security of the area, incitement, and other felonies,” according to court documents.

Nabi Saleh — 20 kilometers (12 miles) north of Ramallah — has been the frequent staging ground for clashes between Israeli soldiers and Palestinians, specifically members of the Tamimi clan, which has a history of getting involved in highly publicized interactions with the IDF.

The videos of the alleged assault were widely picked up by Israeli media, which often accuse Palestinian protesters of seeking to provoke the army into responses which are then filmed.

Israeli politicians hailed the restraint of the soldiers as evidence of the military’s values, but some called for tough responses in the face of seeming embarrassment.

Palestinians on social media criticized Ahed’s arrest in the middle of the night, arguing it is the people’s right to resist military occupation.

According to the Palestinian Ma’an news outlet, at a violent clash in the village last Friday, a cousin of Ahed Tamimi was shot in the head with a rubber bullet and remains in a coma as of Tuesday afternoon.

Bassem Tamimi, the girls’ father, told the Walla news site that before the incident the soldier who sustained the slaps had entered the family home and harmed his son Muhammad, 14. “It was only on camera that he tried to come across as the moral soldier.”

He told Ynet that he rejected what he called attempts by the Israeli media to portray the soldiers as victims. They were standing on his property, he added.

It was not Ahed Tamimi’s first time in the media spotlight.

In August 2015, an IDF soldier was caught on film trying to arrest Ahed’s 12-year-old Muhammad, who had been throwing rocks during a violent protest.

Palestinians fight an Israeli soldier who attempted to arrest a boy at a protest near the West Bank village of Nabi Saleh, near Ramallah, on August 28, 2015. (AFP Photo/Abbas Momani)

In the footage, the soldier appears to forcefully restrain the boy, whose arm is in a cast. On several occasions, he grabs the child around the neck, and presses his head against a boulder to keep him still.

A group of women and children, including Muhammad’s sister Ahed, then begin fighting with the soldier, punching him repeatedly while he holds down the boy. At one point, Ahed bites his hand.

The video of the scuffle went viral online, drawing millions of views.

In 2012, 13-year-old Ahed gained fame among Palestinian activists for an incident in which she led a group of children, including her younger brother, in arguing with Israeli soldiers.

Judah Ari Gross contributed to this report.

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