God-fearing, happy, non-dope-smokers — poll reveals the Israeli ethos
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42% of Israelis say they have sex at least once a week; 23% don't want to talk about it

God-fearing, happy, non-dope-smokers — poll reveals the Israeli ethos

Haaretz survey finds the widest gap between Jews and Arabs when it comes to country’s long-term survival

Israelis celebrating on Independence Day in Jerusalem on April 23, 2015. ( Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
Israelis celebrating on Independence Day in Jerusalem on April 23, 2015. ( Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

A clear majority of Israelis from across the social spectrum say they believe in God, and most define themselves as happy, according to a poll conducted to mark the Jewish New Year holiday on Sunday.

The survey, conducted by veteran pollster Dr. Camil Fuchs for the Haaretz newspaper, found that 70 percent of Israeli Jews and 98% of Israeli Arabs believe in God, with those of a more religious inclination tending to be happier.

According to the poll, 78% of ultra-Orthodox Jews expressed happiness, as did 74% of observant Jews, 64% of Conservative Jews and 59% of those who define themselves as secular.

In terms of contentment, the members of the Druze community topped the poll, with 86% saying they are content with their lives, followed by 71% of Christians, 68% of Muslims and 64% of Jews.

A family takes part in a parade during the Jewish holiday of Purim on March 5, 2015 in the central Israeli city of Netanya. (AFP PHOTO/JACK GUEZ)
A family takes part in a parade during the Jewish holiday of Purim on March 5, 2015 in the central Israeli city of Netanya. (AFP PHOTO/JACK GUEZ)

The greatest disparity between Jews and Arabs appears when it comes to Israel’s long-term survival. Of those polled, 74% of Jews believe that Israel will still exist in 2115, while just 31% of Arabs think that this will be the case. While 82% of Jews perceive themselves as Zionists, just 2% of Arabs share this sentiment.

In terms of day-to-day life, 76% of Israelis expressed concern over housing prices — an enduring issue in the country, and just 47% displayed job satisfaction. Amid economic hardships, 14% of Israelis said that they were considering leaving the country.

The poll also indicated that a majority of Israelis believe religion should play a less dominant role in daily life, with 63% saying they support public transportation on Shabbat, and 55% backing civil marriage for all Israelis.

Most Israelis also believe that women with children have the right to work outside the home, with just 8% of female and 9% of male respondents saying that mothers should not work. In total, 85% of women and 82% of men indicated that women should have a part-time or full-time job out of the home.

But Israelis exhibited a more conservative stance on some social issues, with more than half – 54% — opposing the legalization of soft drugs, and 82% saying they had never smoked marijuana.

Israelis play in a water fountain on an unseasonably hot summer day near the Tower of David in the Old City of Jerusalem on May 27, 2015. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
Israelis play in a water fountain on an unseasonably hot summer day near the Tower of David in the Old City of Jerusalem on May 27, 2015. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

For vacations inside Israel, 33% said they preferred to spend time in the north in the Galilee, while 28% plumped for the resort city of Eilat. Only 11% expressed a preference for the Dead Sea, while just 3% chose the Negev desert.

When it comes to their love lives, 42% of Israelis say they have sex at least once a week, with 22% claiming to be sexually active several times a week. Curiously, a significant number of the generally outspoken Israelis appear to somewhat reticent when discussing their intimate details — almost a quarter (23%) declined to answer this question.

A total of 1,028 people were questioned for the poll — 825 Jews and 203 Arabs. The Jewish respondents were surveyed online, and the Arab respondents polled by telephone.

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