Trump ‘likes’ Oprah, but doubts she’ll run for president
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Trump ‘likes’ Oprah, but doubts she’ll run for president

Amid speculation talk show host could enter 2020 race, US president says ‘I know her very well… I don’t think she’s going to run’

US President Donald Trump is seen ahead of the College Football Championship game between the Alabama Crimson Tide and the Georgia Bulldogs at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia on January 8, 2018. (Mike Lawrie/Getty Images/AFP)
US President Donald Trump is seen ahead of the College Football Championship game between the Alabama Crimson Tide and the Georgia Bulldogs at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia on January 8, 2018. (Mike Lawrie/Getty Images/AFP)

WASHINGTON — US President Donald Trump weighed in on fevered speculation about Oprah Winfrey’s potential 2020 White House bid Tuesday, saying he liked the chat show host, but she probably wouldn’t run against him.

“I like Oprah,” Trump said, adding that he had appeared on her long-running afternoon program.

“I know her very well,” he said, before adding: “I don’t think she’s going to run.”

Winfrey’s rousing speech at Sunday’s Golden Globes Awards ceremony ignited speculation that the billionaire chat show queen is harboring Oval Office ambitions.

Some Democrats — still reeling from their shock loss to Trump in 2016 — have embraced the idea of having their own celebrity leader.

The only fly in the ointment? Winfrey’s denial.

“I don’t, I don’t,” she reportedly said backstage at the Globes when asked if she planned to run.

“There’ll be no running for office of any kind for me,” she told CBS in October.

But fevered speculation only escalated. “Oprah for president? She’s got my vote,” tweeted pop superstar Lady Gaga.

CNN quoted two anonymous “close friends” as saying Winfrey was “actively thinking” about a presidential run. Her longtime partner suggested that she could be persuaded.

‘Isn’t that crazy’

“It’s up to the people,” Stedman Graham was quoted as telling the Los Angeles Times. “She would absolutely do it.”

“I want her to run,” Meryl Streep told The Washington Post. “I don’t think she had any intention (of declaring). But now, she doesn’t have a choice.”

If the speculation is wishful thinking, Winfrey’s fame and wealth, extraordinary personal story overcoming poverty, child sexual abuse and pregnancy to build a $2.8 billion fortune and Oscar-nominated acting career, would stack up nicely in her favor.

“I slept on it and came to the conclusion that the Oprah thing isn’t that crazy,” tweeted Dan Pfeiffer, a former senior adviser to Barack Obama, the president Winfrey was credited with helping to elect in 2008.

Oprah Winfrey poses with the Cecil B. DeMille Award during the 75th Golden Globe Awards on January 7, 2018, in Beverly Hills, California. (AFP Photo/Frederic J. Brown)

Bill O’Reilly, a Trump supporter and ex-Fox News anchor disgraced by sexual harassment allegations, wrote: “How can any politician attack Oprah, a feminine icon, human rights hero, civil rights champion and beloved human being?”

A March 2017 poll by Quinnipiac University gave Winfrey a 52 percent favorable rating compared to Trump’s then 41 percent job approval rating.

Despite Winfrey’s denials, she tweeted in September a New York Post editorial that trumpeted her as the Democrats’ best hope of beating Trump in 2020 with the message: “Thanks for your VOTE of confidence!”

Raised in Nashville, Milwaukee and Mississippi, 63-year-old Winfrey was raped and sexually abused as a child and became pregnant at 14, but miscarried the baby.

After college, she went into journalism before reigning for 25 years as queen of the US talk show, ushering in an era of confessional television before becoming the first black woman to own a television network.

‘Don’t do it’

At the start of the Golden Globes on Sunday, host Seth Meyers playfully encouraged her to run against Trump. Becoming the first black woman to accept the Cecil B. De Mille lifetime achievement award, her speech wove together gender, poverty and race.

Oprah Winfrey arrives with the Cecil B. DeMille Award in the press room during The 75th Annual Golden Globe Awards at The Beverly Hilton Hotel on January 7, 2018 in Beverly Hills, California. (Kevin Winter/Getty Images/AFP)

“For too long, women have not been heard or believed if they dare speak the truth to the power of those men,” she said to a standing ovation. “So I want all the girls watching here now to know that a new day is on the horizon.”

But there was also angst at the idea of electing another television star with zero government experience as commander-in-chief in charge of the nuclear codes.

“Oprah, Don’t Do It” advised a New York Times editorial, calling it a “terrible idea” that would show how far celebrity and ratings have repudiated experience and expertise.

But Republican strategist Rick Wilson suggested Trump’s election, once unthinkable, had rewritten the rules.

“There may be an equation here where the only thing that can beat a celebrity is another celebrity,” he told AFP. “The thought of Oprah isn’t as absurd as it might have been two years ago.”

But if politics is a money game, then the odds are still long.

“There is money around for Oprah, Michelle Obama and George Clooney — but the odds suggest The Donald is going to be hard to beat,” said Rupert Adams, spokesman for global betting chain William Hill.

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