US: Some Clinton schedules will only be released after election
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US: Some Clinton schedules will only be released after election

Government says it will take until December to process minute-by-minute calendar of all meetings by then-secretary of state

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign event in Reno, Nevada  on August 25, 2016. (AFP/Josh Edelson)
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a campaign event in Reno, Nevada on August 25, 2016. (AFP/Josh Edelson)

WASHINGTON (AP) — Seven months after a federal judge ordered the State Department to begin releasing monthly batches of the detailed daily schedules showing meetings by Hillary Clinton during her time as secretary of state, the government told The Associated Press it won’t finish the job before Election Day.

The department has so far released about half of the schedules. Its lawyers said in a phone conference with the AP’s lawyers that the department now expects to release the last of the detailed schedules around Dec. 30, weeks before the next president is inaugurated.

The AP’s lawyers late Friday formally asked the State Department to hasten that effort so that the department could provide all Clinton’s minute-by-minute schedules by Oct. 15. The agency did not immediately respond.

The schedules drew new attention this week after the AP analyzed the ones released so far. The news agency found that more than half the people outside the government who met or spoke by telephone with Clinton while she was secretary of state had given money — either personally or through companies or groups — to the Clinton Foundation. The AP’s analysis focused on people with private interests and excluded her meetings or calls with US federal employees or foreign government representatives.

Russian President Vladimir Putin meets then-US secretary of state Hillary Clinton on her arrival at the APEC summit in Vladivostok, Russia, Sept. 8, 2012. (AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel, pool, file)
Russian President Vladimir Putin meets then-US secretary of state Hillary Clinton on her arrival at the APEC summit in Vladivostok, Russia, Sept. 8, 2012. (AP Photo/Mikhail Metzel, pool, file)

The AP’s reporting was based on official calendars covering Clinton’s entire term plus the more-detailed daily schedules covering roughly half her time as secretary of state. The AP first asked for Clinton’s calendars in 2010 and again in 2013. It then sued the State Department in federal court to obtain the detailed schedules, and the department so far has provided about half of them under court order.

Clinton has said the AP’s analysis was flawed because it did not account fully for all meetings and phone calls during her entire term as secretary. She also said the analysis should have included meetings with federal employees and foreign diplomats. The AP said it focused on her meetings with outsiders because those were more discretionary, as Clinton would normally meet with federal officials and foreign officials as part of her job.

Clinton said she met with people outside government regardless of whether they gave money or charitable commitments to her family’s charity.

“These are people I would be proud to meet with, as any secretary of state would have been proud to meet with, to hear about their work and their insights,” Clinton said this week on CNN.

With the foundation drawing continued attention, Clinton promised Friday to put in place additional safeguards to prevent conflicts of interest with the charity should she win the White House.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets then-US secretary of state Hillary Clinton at the Prime Minister's Office in Jerusalem, November 20, 2012. (Avi Ohayon/GPO via Getty Images)
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu meets then-US secretary of state Hillary Clinton at the Prime Minister’s Office in Jerusalem, November 20, 2012. (Avi Ohayon/GPO via Getty Images)

The foundation issue, along with continued focus on her use of a private email server, has dogged Clinton politically throughout the week, drawing strong criticism from opponent Donald Trump.

Trump spokesman Jason Miller released a statement Friday night saying: “It is unacceptable that the State Department is now refusing to release her official schedule before the election in full. Voters deserve to know the truth before they cast their ballots.”

Chelsea Clinton and former US president Bill Clinton watch as Hillary Clinton speaks on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on July 28, 2016. (Alex Wong/Getty Images/AFP)
Chelsea Clinton and former US president Bill Clinton watch as Hillary Clinton speaks on the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia on July 28, 2016. (Alex Wong/Getty Images/AFP)

Former president Bill Clinton said last week that if his wife is elected president, the foundation will no longer accept foreign or corporate donations.

The State Department is now estimating there are about 2,700 pages of schedules left. Under its process, it is reviewing and censoring them page-by-page to remove personal details such as private phone numbers or email addresses. In some cases it has censored names of people who met privately with Clinton or the subjects they discussed.

A State Department spokeswoman, Elizabeth Trudeau, declined to discuss the ongoing case and noted the agency is struggling with thousands of public records requests.

In court, the AP asked US District Judge Richard Leon in December to order the State Department to produce specific percentages of the remaining schedules every 30 days under a formula so that all would be released before the presidential primary elections were complete.

Instead, because the State Department said it did not know how many pages were left, Leon ordered it in January to release at least 600 pages of schedules every 30 days. Each 600-page group covers about three months of Clinton’s tenure.

Then-secretary of state Hillary Clinton checks her Blackberry from a desk inside a C-17 military plane upon her departure from Malta bound for Tripoli, Libya, October 18, 2011. (AP/Kevin Lamarque, Pool, File)
Then-secretary of state Hillary Clinton checks her Blackberry from a desk inside a C-17 military plane upon her departure from Malta bound for Tripoli, Libya, October 18, 2011. (AP/Kevin Lamarque, Pool, File)

Under the present rate, a government attorney working on behalf of the State Department notified the AP’s lawyers, it will take about four and one-half months — or until Dec. 30 — to release all the remaining schedules through the end of Clinton’s term, in February 2013. The government’s notice late Thursday was the first time the State Department has provided the AP with a measure of how many pages were remaining and when it expected to complete the job.

It was unclear whether the judge will reconsider his earlier decision and order faster results. In the AP’s lawsuit over other Clinton-related files, Leon has said it would be “ridiculous” to allow the State Department to delay until even weeks before the election. He also cited “mounting frustration that this is a project where the State Department may be running out the clock.”

Copyright 2016 The Associated Press.

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