Mohamed Abrini, who has admitted he was the “man in the hat” captured on CCTV before the Brussels airport bombings, said the original targets in the deadly attacks were departure areas for flights to Tel Aviv, the US, and Russia.

The suspect — who fled the airport — sought to downplay his role in the attacks, telling a judge that he would “never hurt a fly” and had never traveled to Syria, France’s BFMTV reported Thursday.

He told a court that airport bomber Ibrahim el Bakraoui had selected the check-in areas for flights to the Jewish state, US and Russia as targets.

The two bombs went off at check-in rows 2 and 11 at the Zaventem Airport, some nine seconds apart on March 22.

Investigators have yet to announce which airlines were targeted in the attack. Initial reports said the bombers blew themselves up near an American Airlines desk, but the airline denied that was the case. Representative Devin Nunes of California, the top lawmaker on the intelligence committee in the US House of Representatives, said on March 23 that US airlines may have been targeted.

The third suspect in the Brussels airport bombings on March 22, 2016 can be seen leaving the scene in a video circulated by Belgian police in effort to track down the man. (Screenshot/YouTube)

The third suspect in the Brussels airport bombings on March 22, 2016, can be seen leaving the scene in a video circulated by Belgian police in effort to track down the man. (Screenshot/YouTube)

Abrini is a long-time petty criminal who grew up with Paris attacks suspect Salah Abdeslam in Belgium’s troubled Molenbeek area.

Already the target of a manhunt over the November terror assaults in Paris, he has also been linked to last month’s Brussels attacks, notably through his fingerprints, found in the apartment where the two airport suicide bombers were staying before they blew themselves up on March 22.

That attack and a second bombing at a Brussels metro station an hour later killed a total of 32 people and injured hundreds more.

Abrini was arrested in the Brussels neighborhood of Anderlecht on Friday and, according to prosecutors, said he was the mystery “man in the hat” seen in surveillance footage next to the two bombers at the airport.

“He confessed his presence at the crime scene,” the federal prosecutor’s office said in a statement Saturday, adding that he also “explained having thrown away his vest (jacket) in a garbage bin and having sold his hat afterward.”

A picture taken off CCTV purporting to show suspects in the Brussels airport attack on March 22, 2016. Faycal C may be the man on the right, sources told AFP on March 26, 2016 (Twitter)

A picture taken off CCTV purporting to show suspects in the Brussels airport attack on March 22, 2016. Faycal C may be the man on the right, sources told AFP on March 26, 2016 (Twitter)

But even before the Brussels bombings, Abrini, 31, was a wanted man over his suspected role in the November 13 gun and suicide bomb attacks in Paris, in which 130 people died.

The Belgian of Moroccan origin was seen at a gas station north of Paris two days before the attacks with prime suspect Abdeslam, who drove one of the vehicles used in the attacks.

Belgian authorities have charged Abrini with “participation in the activities of a terrorist group and terrorist murders” over the massacres in the French capital.

During the course of the inquiry, it emerged that Abrini has a long record of theft and drug possession, with his brother confirming he had done stints in jail.

“‘Brioche’ [Abrini] is someone who likes money a lot and who has had a lot of money. In fact, he was reputed to have made himself 200,000 euros. That is a thief,” fellow suspect Ali Oulkadi told Belgian investigators.

“He never spoke about religion or anything like that.”

Identified as a radical Islamist by Belgian investigators, Abrini is believed to have briefly visited Syria last year, and his younger brother Suleiman, 20, died there.

Salah Abdeslam (left), suspected of involvement in the November 13, 2015 terror attacks in Paris with his friend Hamza Attou seen entering a convenience store at 9:45 a.m. on 14 November near the France-Belgium border. (Screen capture: BFM TV)

Salah Abdeslam (left), suspected of involvement in the November 13, 2015 terror attacks in Paris with his friend Hamza Attou seen entering a convenience store at 9:45 a.m. on 14 November near the France-Belgium border. (Screen capture: BFM TV)

He was known to security services for belonging to the same cell as Abdelhamid Abaaoud, one of the organizers of the Paris attacks and one of the gunmen who opened fire on bars, restaurants and a concert hall there.

Abrini and Abdeslam — who was arrested near his family home in Molenbeek after a four-month manhunt — grew up together as teenage friends in the district, where they used to live next door to each other.

Belgian prosecutors said after Abrini’s arrest that he and Abdeslam had also rented an apartment in the Paris suburbs used by the November 13 gunmen before their deadly rampage.

The black Renault Clio the pair were driving was later used to transport the three suicide attackers who struck outside the Stade de France, and investigators believe Abrini accompanied Abdeslam and his brother Brahim — another attacker — on two other trips between Brussels and Paris.

Interviewed by AFP in November, Abrini’s family swore that on the night of the Paris bloodshed he was in Molenbeek, the tough, immigrant-heavy neighborhood that has earned a reputation as a haven for radical jihadists.

His mother has said that he never spoke of going to Syria or of IS. “They say he is dangerous, that he is armed… It makes me sick,” she said.

His repeated trips between Paris and Brussels, however, suggested he played at least a logistical role in the tangled network of Islamic State terrorists behind two of the worst terror attacks on European soil in recent years.