Einstein letter surfaces thanking New Yorker for helping Jews flee Nazi Germany
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Einstein letter surfaces thanking New Yorker for helping Jews flee Nazi Germany

Financier David Finck's daughter kept note locked away for 50 years. 'I wanted to show it to my children and grandchildren. Every contribution, no matter how small, is important'

Albert Einstein (CC-BY-Ferdinand Schmutzer, Wikimedia Commons)
Albert Einstein (CC-BY-Ferdinand Schmutzer, Wikimedia Commons)

A Chicago woman has revealed a letter Albert Einstein sent her father, thanking him for his efforts to rescue Jews from Nazi Germany.

Enid Bronstein told Chicago’s WGN TV that Einstein sent the missive to her father David Finck in June 1939, before the start of World War II, as many Jews tried to flee Hitler’s regime.

Finck, a New York financier, helped fund the emmigration of several such refugees.

“May I offer my sincere congratulations to you on the splendid work you have undertaken on behalf of the refugees,” Einstein said in the letter.

“The power of resistance which has enabled the Jewish people to survive for thousands of years has been based to a large extent on traditions of mutual helpfulness,” he wrote. “We have no other means of self-defense than our solidarity and our knowledge that the cause for which we are suffering is a momentous and sacred cause.”

He added: “It must be a source of deep gratification to you to be making so important a contribution toward rescuing our persecuted fellow Jews from their calamitous peril and leading them toward a better future.”

WGN TV said the German-born physicist is known to have penned several such letters in 1939. Bronstein’s is the third to surface.

Bronstein said she had kept the letter locked away in a safety deposit box for the past 50 years.

“I wanted to keep the letter to show it to my children and grandchildren so that they would get the message that every contribution, no matter how small, is important,” she said.

She has now said she will donate the item to the US Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC.

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