England fans filmed making Nazi salutes at World Cup
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England fans filmed making Nazi salutes at World Cup

English Football Association says police looking for supporters singing anti-Semitic songs at Volgograd pub ahead of Tunisia match

The English Football Association has condemned a video purportedly showing British fans at the World Cup performing Nazi salutes and singing anti-Semitic songs.

The videos posted on Twitter and identified as being taken at a pub in Volgograd, where England played Tunisia on Monday, and were shared on social media by former England player Stan Collymore, now a broadcaster.

The Telegraph reported that the incident occurred ahead of England’s 2-1 win over Tunisia in Volgograd on June 18.

“We strongly condemn the actions of the people in this video. We are working with the relevant authorities, including the UK Police investigations team, who are making enquiries to identify the individuals involved and take appropriate action.”

The governing body added that “the disgraceful conduct of the individuals in this video does not represent the values of the majority of English football fans supporting the team in Russia.”

The clip has also been denounced in Russia, where it was widely shared on social media.

Hours before the match, English fans in Volgograd laid a wreath at the Motherland Calls monument to the estimated hundreds of thousands of Soviets who died during the Battle of Stalingrad, a turning point in World War II.

Ahead of the tournament, English supporters were warned to be respectful of sacred sites marking the suffering of Russians, particularly by not draping British or English flags on war memorials.

“If people go and get drunk, sing songs about the war or political figures, bear in mind there isn’t a great understanding of the English language in Russia, there is a massive potential for that to be taken as a great offense and then provoke a hostile reaction, possibly from the locals, possibly from law enforcement,” said Deputy Chief Constable Mark Roberts, the head of British football policing. “Part of the deal is, if you go to another country you accept their laws, their culture, their customs and people need to be alive to that.”

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