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Jerusalem gay pride stabber found fit for remand

Court to hold Yishai Schlissel’s for another 12 days; he refuses legal counsel

Yishai Schlissel, who stabbed six people at the annual Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade on July 30, 2015, is seen in the Jerusalem Magistrate's Court on July 31, 2015. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)
Yishai Schlissel, who stabbed six people at the annual Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade on July 30, 2015, is seen in the Jerusalem Magistrate's Court on July 31, 2015. (Yonatan Sindel/Flash90)

The assailant who stabbed six people at Jerusalem’s gay pride parade on Thursday — after committing a nearly identical crime 10 years ago — was found fit for remand on Friday.

Israel Prison Service’s submitted an initial psychological evaluation of Yishai Schlissel to the Jerusalem Magistrate’s Court, which extended Schlissel’s remand by 12 days.

Schlissel, who previously served a 10-year term for a 2005 stabbing attack on the Jerusalem gay pride parade, refused legal counsel. An ultra-Orthodox Jew, he said he did not recognize the legal standing of the court since it did not abide by Jewish law.

“The court does not work in accordance with the holy Torah, and is part of the mechanism of evil,” he said.

Two of the six stabbing victims — a teenage girl and 26-year-old man — remained in serious condition on Friday.

Israeli police came under fire Thursday after it emerged that Schlissel had made a series of statements following his release from prison three weeks ago, indicating that he was planning another attack on the gay pride rally.

Following his release, Schlissel distributed a handwritten, anti-gay manifesto in which he called the pride march “shameful” and “blasphemous,” and alluded to plans to perpetrate another attack.

“It is incumbent upon every Jew to risk beatings or imprisonment and together to stop the desecration for the sanctity of His name. If we refrain from declaring war, they’ll feel free to spread this shame all over the world,” he said.

Eleven days ago, Schlissel gave an interview to an ultra-Orthodox media channel in which he said his 2005 attack was “an act of extremism… but this march has to be stopped.” The gay community wants to “despoil the people of Israel,” he said.

Two eyewitnesses told The Times of Israel that before the attack, a policewoman noticed Schlissel approaching the parade and told him to stay away.

Security forces reach for an ultra-Orthodox Jew attacking people with a knife during a Gay Pride parade Thursday, July 30, 2015 in central Jerusalem. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
Security forces reach for an ultra-Orthodox Jew attacking people with a knife during a Gay Pride parade Thursday, July 30, 2015 in central Jerusalem. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)

Schlissel presumably walked along side streets adjacent to the march route and rejoined the parade near the corner of Washington and Keren Hayesod streets, where he ran at the crowd screaming and began stabbing people with a kitchen knife.

A policeman told reporters that while police were aware that Schlissel had been released, they did not have any concrete information that he was planning another attack.

Edri said the police investigation was still in its early stages and did not disclose any further information.

At the Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade, July 30, 2015 (Eric Cortellessa/Times of Israel)
At the Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade, July 30, 2015 (Eric Cortellessa/Times of Israel)

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