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Liberman: European parliaments lying like ‘Protocols’

In scathing attack, foreign minister lashes European backing of Palestinian statehood, says Ramallah’s moves prove failure of Oslo

Stuart Winer is a breaking news editor at The Times of Israel.

Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman at the Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem, January 4, 2014 (photo credit: Hadas Parush/Flash90)
Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman at the Foreign Ministry in Jerusalem, January 4, 2014 (photo credit: Hadas Parush/Flash90)

Foreign Minister Avigdor Liberman launched a bitter attack against European and Palestinian leaders Sunday, saying Ramallah’s unilateral moves toward statehood proved the death of the Oslo Accords and accusing European parliaments of recreating anti-Semitic lies.

Speaking at a conference of Israel’s European ambassadors, Liberman denounced the attitudes of European lawmakers as comparable to a century-old anti-Semitic hoax.

“The lies told during debates in the European parliaments are reminiscent of the Protocols of the Elders of Zion,” Liberman said, referencing the document that claims a Jewish plan for world domination, which has been used as a canard for anti-Jewish attacks.

Liberman singled out Sweden and Ireland, both of which recently passed parliamentary votes calling for recognition of a Palestinian state, and likened their actions to the 1938 Munich agreement in which Britain and France ceded control of the Sudetenland region to Germany in an appeasement that ultimately failed to prevent World War II.

“The behavior of Sweden and Ireland toward us is comparable with that which led to the breakup of Czechoslovakia,” he said.

Lashing out at the Palestinians over their bids to impose terms on Israel at the United Nations Security Council and to pursue war crimes allegations by joining the International Criminal Court in The Hague, Liberman said this proved the Oslo Accords had “failed.”

He also called for Israel to take the initiative in launching a peace process, instead of reacting to Palestinian moves.

Liberman went on to stress the importance of regaining alliances in Europe.

“Our big challenge is not the Palestinians and not the Arab countries, but the countries of the West,” he said.

Last December the European Union voted overwhelmingly to “in principle” back recognition of a Palestinian state.

The motion was a watered-down version of an original resolution which had urged EU member states to recognize a Palestinian state unconditionally.

Parliaments in France, Britain, Spain, Ireland and Portugal have all passed votes supporting eventual recognition of a Palestinian state.

Sweden has gone even further, officially recognizing Palestine as a state.

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