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Study shows 88% of products in Israel hold multiple kosher stamps

A man walks into a kosher McDonald's restaurant in central Jerusalem, on April 13, 2016. (Nati Shohat/Flash90)
A man walks into a kosher McDonald's restaurant in central Jerusalem, on April 13, 2016. (Nati Shohat/Flash90)

A new study by the Israel Democracy Institute of the kosher certification industry in Israel finds that the vast majority of products sold in the country are certified by multiple kashrut organizations.

Therefore, the IDI says, there is no reason for the Chief Rabbinate’s monopoly over kosher certification in Israel, since most products are already certified by private agencies. According to the study, a whopping 88% of products sold in Israeli supermarkets have more than one kashrut certification.

Just 12% of products sold, says the IDI, hold only the certification from a local rabbinate. Food production companies apply for a rabbinate certification — on top of others that they want — simply because the law requires them to, the IDI says. Therefore, the think tank suggests, “the existing situation leads to unnecessary duplication of kashrut certifications and to excess costs to both the suppliers and the consumers.”

The reform to the kosher certification agency proposed by Religious Services Minister Matan Kahana was discussed in the Knesset earlier today.

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