When it comes to Israeli chutzpah, the proof is in the pictures
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A lot of nerve

When it comes to Israeli chutzpah, the proof is in the pictures

A new photography exhibit at the Holon Institute of Technology shows, as if we doubted it, that Israelis have loads of nerve

Jessica Steinberg covers the Sabra scene from south to north and back to the center.

  • From the mouths of babes (Courtesy Milik)
    From the mouths of babes (Courtesy Milik)
  • Graffiti in one's underwear (Courtesy Yigal Ophir)
    Graffiti in one's underwear (Courtesy Yigal Ophir)
  • Gotta make sure the grilled meat will be ready for the Yom Haatzmaut barbecue (Courtesy Shiran Rokvan)
    Gotta make sure the grilled meat will be ready for the Yom Haatzmaut barbecue (Courtesy Shiran Rokvan)
  • Piles of garbage just where a sign asks people to refrain from littering (Courtesy Yael Argov)
    Piles of garbage just where a sign asks people to refrain from littering (Courtesy Yael Argov)

It’s hard to truly translate Israeli chutzpah, that combination of audacity, nerve and boldness that characterizes the Israeli identity, but there’s no doubting its ubiquity.

Now, a new photography exhibit at Holon’s Institute of Technology proves the point, in full color.

Titled “Israeli Chutzpah,” the exhibit opened January 2, and closes February 8. It’s in honor of the country’s 70th birthday, coming up this spring, and asks whether the Israeli national identity is a blessing or a curse.

Anything to get the shot (Courtesy Dubi Feiner)

The curators put out a call for photographers’ works on the subject, accepting both professional and amateur photos. They received a myriad of looks at the reality, from stereotypes to more positive views.

The final result is 35 photographs from 20 photographers, each one telling a story, offering a viewpoint, looking at a scene — and all illustrating that characteristic chutzpah.

Go take a look for yourself: The exhibition is at the Holon Institute of Technology, 52 Golomb Road, Building 5, third floor. Open Sunday through Thursday, 9 a.m. – 8 p.m., Fridays 9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

 

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