Hundreds of etrogs held up at airport in England over new import regulations
search
Jewish leader says her group helped save Sukkot

Hundreds of etrogs held up at airport in England over new import regulations

Animal and Plant Health Agency eventually allows the import of citron fruit used for Sukkot on condition stalks are trimmed and they are destroyed after holiday

Illustrative: Etrogs for sale at the 'four-species' market in Jerusalem on October 13, 2016. (Sebi Berens/Flash90)
Illustrative: Etrogs for sale at the 'four-species' market in Jerusalem on October 13, 2016. (Sebi Berens/Flash90)

Hundreds of etrogs, the citron fruit used for the holiday of Sukkot, were seized at an airport in England.

The Animal and Plant Health Agency held up the shipment at the Manchester Airport under new and stricter regulations on the import of citrus fruit. Etrog importers were unaware of the new rules, the London-based Jewish Chronicle reported.

The Board of Deputies of British Jews worked with the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs to have the 600 etrogs taken to a Manchester synagogue, where the stalks could be trimmed to meet the stricter rules, the Board of Deputies reported. The fruits also must be destroyed immediately after the holiday.

Some 10,000 etrogs were due to be imported to Britain for Sukkot this year.

Vice President of the Board of Deputies of British Jews Marie van der Zyl (photo: Board of Deputies of British Jews)

Board of Deputies President Marie van der Zyl said the board’s “timely intervention” has “potentially saved Sukkot.”

“The waving of the lulav (palm branch) and etrog with hadas (myrtle) and arava (willow) is an essential and iconic part of the festival and it was vital to ensure the supply of etrogs for this year,” she said in a statement.

Van der Zyl called on suppliers to “ensure that etrogs are imported in full compliance with regulations in the years ahead.”

The shipment was seized at the end of last month.

Join us!
A message from the Editor of Times of Israel
David Horovitz

The Times of Israel covers one of the most complicated, and contentious, parts of the world. Determined to keep readers fully informed and enable them to form and flesh out their own opinions, The Times of Israel has gradually established itself as the leading source of independent and fair-minded journalism on Israel, the region and the Jewish world.

We've achieved this by investing ever-greater resources in our journalism while keeping all of the content on our site free.

Unlike many other news sites, we have not put up a paywall. But we would like to invite readers who can afford to do so, and for whom The Times of Israel has become important, to help support our journalism by joining The Times of Israel Community. Join now and for as little as $6 a month you can both help ensure our ongoing investment in quality journalism, and enjoy special status and benefits as a Times of Israel Community member.

Become a member of The Times of Israel Community
read more:
comments