search

Holocaust survivor, scholar awarded $815,000 Balzan Prize

Author Saul Friedlander during the Leipzig Book Fair award ceremony in Leipzig, eastern Germany, March 22, 2007. (AP Photo/Eckehard Schulz, File)
Author Saul Friedlander during the Leipzig Book Fair award ceremony in Leipzig, eastern Germany, March 22, 2007. (AP Photo/Eckehard Schulz, File)

Israeli-French-American Holocaust survivor and historian Saul Friedlander is announced as one the recipients of this year’s Balzan Prizes, recognizing scholarly and scientific achievements.

Friedlander, who has taught at both the University of California, Los Angeles and Tel Aviv University, is awarded the prize for Holocaust and Genocide Studies for his work broadening the perspective on the history of the Holocaust.

Friedlander, 88, was born in Prague in 1932 in a non-religious Jewish family, which fled to France after the German occupation in March 1939. His parents hid him in a Catholic boarding school near Vichy, where they were later captured and sent to Auschwitz.

With his parents’ agreement, Friedlander was baptized as a Catholic and later, out of his own conviction, considered becoming a priest. After he learned in 1946 that his parents had been killed at Auschwitz, Friedlander reclaimed his Jewish identity. He later said, “for the first time, I felt Jewish.”

Friedlander was recognized for examining the persecution of all Jews in Europe, going beyond country-focused studies that had preceded him, and for making personal documents accepted in scholarly practice.

“His authority is special in the sense that he is both a scholar and a victim of the Holocaust. He says that you can study your own experiences in a critical way,’’ says Marjan Schwegman, a Dutch historian who announced the prize. “The way he integrates the voices of victims, perpetrators and bystanders in this narrative has changed the way historians write about the history of the Holocaust.”

comments
Never miss breaking news on Israel
Get notifications to stay updated
You're subscribed