Son says slain farmer was a victim of terrorism
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Son says slain farmer was a victim of terrorism

Police question suspects in fatal beating of David Bar-Kapara, but make no arrests

Daniel Bar, son of a farmer murdered in a field outside Rehobot on June 24, speaks to Ynet on Thursday, June 25, 2015. (screen capture: Ynet)
Daniel Bar, son of a farmer murdered in a field outside Rehobot on June 24, speaks to Ynet on Thursday, June 25, 2015. (screen capture: Ynet)

As Israeli authorities investigate the possibility of terrorism in the fatal beating of an Israeli farmer Wednesday, the victim’s son charged that the culprits were two masked Arab men who targeted his father because he was Israeli.

David Bar-Kapara, 70, a resident of Rehovot, was discovered Wednesday afternoon near Pedaya, in serious condition, with signs of violence on his body. He succumbed to his injuries shortly thereafter at Assaf Harofeh Hospital. He was laid to rest on Thursday evening.

“The fact that police are investigating all of the possibilities is fine, but it was two masked Arabic speakers, whom all the workers recognize and know are Palestinians,” Bar-Kapara’s son, Daniel Bar, told Channel 2 on Thursday.

He said Thai farm workers fled the scene when the masked men arrived, and later returned and found Bar-Kapara’s body.

“We think it was a nationalistically motivated attack,” he told the Ynet website. “Someone who arrives masked and speaking Arabic — I don’t know what else it could be.”

David Bar-Kapara (courtesy of family)
David Bar-Kapara (courtesy of family)

Bar dismissed the possibility of a criminal motive, saying that his father, a grape farmer, was never threatened.

“My father loved the Torah, the people of Israel and the Land of Israel, studied Torah and went every day to his vineyard, was a father of five and a grandfather of 14,” he told Channel 2.

Bar-Kapara’s funeral was scheduled to set to take place at 5 p.m. on Thursday in Rehovot.

Police brought a number of people in for questioning, but as of Thursday afternoon had yet to make any arrests.

Police could not immediately ascertain whether the motive was criminal or nationalistic. Two Palestinian illegals who were suspected in the killing fled the scene, and police were searching for them.

Representatives of the Shin Bet security service also arrived at the scene to investigate whether it was a terror attack.

Police detected a strong odor of pesticide at the scene, according to the report. It was not immediately clear if the odor was linked to the Bar-Kapara’s death.

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