US expands campaign against IS, bombing Iraq’s Haditha Dam
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US expands campaign against IS, bombing Iraq’s Haditha Dam

Military officials fear Islamic State could take control of electricity generation, or flood Baghdad

Haditha Dam, a major hydroelectric contributor to the power system in Iraq. (photo credit: Wikimedia/US Army Corps of Engineers)
Haditha Dam, a major hydroelectric contributor to the power system in Iraq. (photo credit: Wikimedia/US Army Corps of Engineers)

TBILISI, Georgia — The US military launched airstrikes Sunday around Haditha Dam in western Iraq, targeting Islamic State insurgents there for the first time in a move to prevent the group from capturing the vital dam.

US officials said that while the Anbar Province dam remains in control of the Iraqis, the US offensive was an effort to beat back militants who have been trying to take over key dams across the country, including the Haditha complex.

“We conducted these strikes to prevent terrorists from further threatening the security of the dam, which remains under control of Iraqi Security Forces, with support from Sunni tribes,” Pentagon Press Secretary Rear Admiral John Kirby said in a statement.

The dam is a major source of water and electrical power and the airstrikes were made at the request of the Iraqi government, he said.

The officials were traveling with US Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel who was in Georgia for talks with defense and other leaders. His visit comes on the heels of the two-day NATO summit in Wales.

Last month Islamic State fighters were battling to capture the Haditha Dam, which has six power generators located alongside Iraq’s second-largest reservoir. But, despite their attacks, Iraqi forces there backed up by local Sunni tribes have been able to hold them off.

The group was able to take control of the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq last month, but persistent US airstrikes dislodged the militants. And while fighters have been trying to take it back, the US has continued to use strikes to keep them at bay.

“We will continue to conduct operations as needed in support of the Iraqi Security Forces and the Sunni tribes, working with those forces securing Haditha Dam,” Kirby said.

US officials have expressed concerns that militants could flood Baghdad and other large swaths of the country if they control the dams. It also would give the group control over electricity, which they could use to strengthen their control over residents.

Earlier this year, the group gained control of the Fallujah Dam on the Euphrates River and the militants used it as a weapon, opening it to flood downriver when government forces moved in on the city.

Water is a precious commodity in Iraq, a largely desert country of 32.5 million people. The decline of water levels in the Euphrates over recent years has led to electricity shortages in towns south of Baghdad, where steam-powered generators depend entirely on water levels.

On Friday and Saturday, the US used a mix of attack aircraft, fighter jets and drones to conduct two airstrikes around Irbil. The strikes hit trucks and armored vehicles. Those operations brought the total number of airstrikes to 133 since early August.

The airstrikes are aimed at protecting US personnel and facilities, as well protecting critical infrastructure and aiding refugees fleeing the militants.

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press.

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