Wonder Woman Lynda Carter rules the Met Gala in Hebrew crown
search
Jew-elry

Wonder Woman Lynda Carter rules the Met Gala in Hebrew crown

Kabbalah follower Madonna rocks a crown of crosses at the ‘Sunday Best’ themed fashion extravaganza

Lynda Carter at The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute benefit gala, May 7, 2018, in New York. (Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)
Lynda Carter at The Metropolitan Museum of Art's Costume Institute benefit gala, May 7, 2018, in New York. (Charles Sykes/Invision/AP)

It’s a night known for extravagant gowns and outlandish headpieces, but original Wonder Woman Lynda Carter was perhaps queen of the ball in her crown adorned with Hebrew writing and Star of David jewelry at Monday’s Met Gala in New York, arguably the most sought-after invitation in the celebrity universe.

Swapping the trademark superhero headband in favor of a crown emblazoned with the Hebrew phrase “l’olam al tishkachi” (never forget) Gal Gadot’s predecessor in the iconic role swept down the red carpet in a regal gown designed by Zac Posen.

Held every year on the first Monday in May, the black-tie extravaganza is the chief source of income for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute, reportedly raising more than $12 million in 2017.

The gathering of A-list models, musicians and movie stars, dubbed “the Oscars of the East Coast,” saw Amal Clooney, Rihanna, and Donatella Versace join Vogue supremo Anna Wintour as this year’s co-chairs.

Lynda Carter at The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute benefit gala, May 7, 2018, in New York. (Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

Tickets are said to cost $30,000 each or $275,000 for a table, but all guests must be invited, ruling out all but the most elite Hollywood actors, music superstars, top models and fashion designers.

If A-listers have shunned the theme in the past, this year’s “Sunday Best ” — a nod to the “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination” exhibition at The Costume Institute — proved popular.

Despite being perhaps Kabbalah’s best-known follower, Madonna seemed to return to her Catholic roots, rocking an all-black Jean Paul Gaultier frock with a crown made of crosses that was perhaps more reminiscent of her controversial “Like a Prayer” music video than her more recent association with Jewish mysticism.

“Religion and spirituality has informed my work for my entire career, and fashion also, and combining the two is the perfect marriage,” said the pop star. “And then we bring in Jean Paul and it’s the perfect three-way!”

Madonna attends The Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute benefit gala celebrating the opening of the Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination exhibition on Monday, May 7, 2018, in New York. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP)

But for all the glitz, the event has also been dogged by rumors that once inside, it can be intimidating and unfriendly.

Tina Fey once called it a “jerk parade,” complaining to David Letterman: “If you had a million arms and all the people you would punch in the whole world, they’re all there.”

read more:
comments